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Fox News’ ‘Outnumbered’ Spirals into Pure Nonsense as Hosts Try to Discuss Vaccines (Video)

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fox-news-vaccinesIt’s always interesting when an issue is brought up among conservatives that mixes two conflicting ideological issues. As we all know, conservatives are vehemently anti-government. If the government “mandates” anything, the conspiracy wackos typically spiral into some irrational fear-mongering diatribe that usually ends with some sort of Nazi reference or implication that there’s some other dastardly scheme the government is trying to concoct. So when you have an issue such as the anti-vaccine movement that’s largely driven by liberals, mixed with the possibility of government mandated vaccines, conservatives don’t seem to know what to say.


Though typically when I see these debates take place, the paranoid anti-government side usually wins out. That’s what happened on Fox News’ Outnumbered when the recent measles outbreak was brought up and the subject on whether or not parents should be required to vaccinate their children was discussed.

At first it seemed that for once common sense might prevail when host Kennedy Montgomery said, “Sure, it may be a parent’s choice whether or not they vaccinate a child, the problem is, when you get my child sick, it’s not just your problem or your choice.”

But then it was all downhill from there.

“I refuse to judge on either side,” fellow co-host Harris Faulkner said. “Because how you choose to love, how I choose to love, we all love our kids. Our choices are different.”

That statement might make sense if the information that’s been driving the anti-vaccine movement wasn’t based on myths that have been soundly debunked by proven science, and the 1998 study often linked to the rise of the anti-vaccine movement hadn’t been called a “deliberate fraud” concocted by a former doctor (he was stripped of his license) who knowingly falsified data. But that hasn’t stopped the continued spread of misinformation about vaccines.

“There is a lot of controversy especially with those vaccinations when it comes to newborn babies,” co-host Andrea Tantaros replied. “And not just about measles. I know, personally, I had a brother who was autistic, and there is a belief among many that it’s not the actual vaccinations that cause autism, it’s the proximity of the vaccinations, that their teeny-tiny little immune systems can’t handle those vaccinations so soon after the other.”

If by “belief among many” she means people who ignore the overwhelming amount of scientific evidence that debunks these anti-vaccine myths then she’s right about that. There are far too many people who take the advice of former MTV Singled Out co-host Jenny McCarthy about vaccines instead of, you know – just about every doctor and scientist on the planet. 

But Tantaros wasn’t done.

“So, I am sensitive to every parent’s concern,” she added. “I do think it’s a public health issue. I am sensitive though also to the people, maybe for religious reasons or other reasons, who have these beliefs. And I wouldn’t want to trample on them.”

Yes, by all means let’s not “trample on the rights” of those parents who put everyone else’s children at risk because they don’t “believe” in proven medical facts. That’s exactly what we need to be worried about as diseases we thought were eradicated continue to show up in record numbers.

And then the real anti-government idiocy reared its ugly head.


“But I’m very worried about a government that can start telling you, regular citizens, that you have to get a flu shot, that you have to do this, or you have to get 35 vaccines before they hit 36 months,” co-host Jedidiah Bila remarked. “That concerns me. And what comes next?”

Yes, fear the government! First they’ll want your children to be free of harmful or deadly diseases …next comes microchips and fascist indoctrination!

I love the Internet, but one of its biggest downfalls is it’s now become far too easy for morons to seem credible and spread complete and utter nonsense. Proven facts that were never “debated on” because crackpots were never given a forum to spew their drivel are now being questioned, and the crackpots are being given actual legitimacy. The world is difficult enough debating complex issues where adults really need to come together to find solutions to solve problems without having to deal with a bunch of fools from the peanut gallery wasting all of our time.

Watch the segment below via Fox News:


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Allen Clifton is a native Texan who now lives in the Austin area. He has a degree in Political Science from Sam Houston State University. Allen is a co-founder of Forward Progressives and creator of the popular Right Off A Cliff column and Facebook page. Be sure to follow Allen on Twitter and Facebook, and subscribe to his channel on YouTube as well.

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  • Pipercat

    It was only a matter of time before this nonsense crossed political divide. Now we can actually say, we’ve heard bullshit disguised as cogent arguments from both sides that are equal, fair and balanced.

  • Cemetery Girl

    I think it makes sense for the conservative base to side with anti-vax, not just because big government is telling people what to do (because they don’t mind big government telling people who they can marry, what they can do with their bodies, or that they should practice Christian customs in public), but it is a way too woo people to their base. My experience from running into firm anti-vaxers is they’re mostly middle class white mothers. What better way to win their support than agree the scary government shouldn’t force you to inject dangerous poison that is proven to make them Autistic into their kids? I’ve encountered many that refuse to vax that firmly believe that it doesn’t matter because their kids live in a nice suburb, so they won’t ever come in contact with measles or whooping couch (it’s poor kids and people from other countries that get that.) They also argue that if my kids are up to date (which they are) I shouldn’t worry because I’ve bought into the idea that they’re protected (even though I know that actually means they’re just less likely to contract the illnesses if exposed.) They have also argued herd immunity is a myth (and use recent outbreaks as proof) and will argue they aren’t putting people that can’t be vaccinated and/or have lower immunity because of a medial issue. (Not their problem, can’t be exposed to dangerous disease then don’t leave your house.)