Chris Christie Just Ended His Chances Of Becoming President With This Promise

chris-christie-foxChris Christie isn’t in the crowded 2016 GOP field just yet, but he’s already made it highly unlikely that he’ll find himself a faction of the Republican Party supportive of his candidacy should he decide to run. If Chris Christie does decide to join the pack of potential presidential candidates, he would be one of the few Republicans with executive experience who also happens to be from a blue state, the others being George Pataki of New York and Scott Walker of Wisconsin.


Yesterday, Chris Christie was on “Face the Nation” and made it absolutely clear that if he were president, he would go after states that allow legal, recreational marijuana.

The Republican governor, speaking on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” said his administration would use federal rules that outlaw marijuana to clamp down on states that legalized recreational pot use.

“Yes sir,” Christie told host John Dickerson when asked whether he’d go after Colorado and Washington.

“If you were president would you return the federal prosecutions in the states of Colorado, Washington states?” Dickerson asked.

“Yes,” Christie said.

“So, if somebody’s enjoying that now in their state, if you’re president, that’s getting turned off?” Dickerson continued.

“Correct,” Christie responded. (Source)

Being against marijuana legalization and using federal powers to prosecute recreational users and growers in states like Colorado may play well to some evangelical Christians or old school social conservatives, but it absolutely will not fly with Rand Paul supporters and moderates. Younger voters of both parties tend to be far more open-minded about marijuana legalization and gay marriage, and hyping up old & outdated stances on these issues will deal a huge blow to any campaign on a national stage.

Chris Christie also isn’t going to impress anyone on the far right due to the fact that while he has done his part to bust unions (like Scott Walker has done with much success in Wisconsin), he also signed a law banning LGBT “conversion therapy,” which is a practice many supporters of Rick Santorum or Bobby Jindal support.


In the interest of fairness, it needs to be pointed out that New Jersey law does allow for medical marijuana use, but not for all conditions, including PTSD. However, Chris Christie not only stated his promise to use federal laws to clamp down on states like Colorado, he also pretty much said that he doesn’t care what the people there think about it.

Asked how this might affect his election prospects in Colorado, a key swing state in presidential elections, Christie didn’t budge.

“I think there’s probably a lot of people in Colorado who are not too thrilled with what’s going on there right now,” he said. “You know the way you win any state? You go out and you tell people the truth and you lay out your ideas. And you either win or you lose. But I don’t believe that people just want to be told what they want to hear. I believe they want to be told the truth as the person who’s running sees it.”

Speaking more broadly about drug addiction, Christie said that a president can use the bully pulpit to help “lower stigma” about seeking treatment for drug and alcohol addiction.

“Right now people, as I said before, see it as a moral failing,” he said. The president can carry a message of, “You’re not a failure, you’re sick and we want to help you get better, and we’re gonna, in this country, emphasize, for first time, that this is a disease and that we need to give people the treatment that they need to get better,” he added.

Christie also said, “We can no longer incarcerate our way out of this problem,” a nod to the growing movement to reform drug sentencing laws. (Source)

If Chris Christie sees recreational marijuana usage as a problem and wants to enforce current federal laws against it, yet at the same time says putting people in jail isn’t the way out of the problem, then exactly what does he suggest we do? Are we going to force people to go to rehab for simply smoking pot while millions of Americans struggle with addiction to legal drugs like alcohol and prescription pills, which are far more dangerous than marijuana?

It’s completely predictable that someone from the party that claims they want smaller government is, as usual, proposing government intrusion into a market that is providing millions of dollars of revenue to the states it is legal in. There are areas where we do need the government to intervene, but keeping adults from smoking a plant is definitely not one of them.

Chris Christie could have stated that he supported regulated use of marijuana or even decriminalization of recreational possession, and he could have staked out a spot as an experienced, moderate Republican governor from a blue state and differentiated himself from the crowd. He could have been a real candidate, he could have been a contender – but he blew it.



Comments

Facebook comments

  • Clintoris

    Its sad that someone’s desire to get high for recreational purposes would actually influence their vote considering all the crap happening around the world right now.

    • Avatar

      You sounds like religious fanatic to me. Sad tha you can’t see that child abusers in religious institutions are enjoying more freedom than peaceful cannabis rec users. Turn off the Fox News.

      • Avatar

        I don’t mind to tell you a joke but nah.

    • Avatar

      Oh by the way, your screen name clearly doesn’t make you well credibility for cannabis debates. Grow up.

    • Nancy B

      You have a point. But, to me, it points to much deeper flaws in a candidate: unwillingness to acknowledge state’s rights and popular opinion, in matters that do not affect others’ civil rights, and squandering money on unnecessary investigation and prosecution, instead of spending those energies on other things that matter, as you mentioned.

      • OMGface

        Not to mention, “Sratch a bully, find a coward.”

    • Melissa Wittner

      Of course that source would say so. You can skew that either way depending on which site you look at. See what mine says?
      https://patients4medicalmarijuana.wordpress.com/marijuana-info/marijuana-vs-cigarettes/

    • OMGface

      Did you know there was a time, thru early 20th century when all drugs were legal? Read history, esp re PROHIBITION. Not only was it an epic fail, but learn all it spawned.

      • Flat Banana

        What is your point?

    • Evan

      If you think the only reason someone might oppose cracking down on recreational marijuana is because they want to get high, you’re mistaken.

      I don’t use marijuana. I don’t like it. I don’t like the smell of it, I don’t like how it makes me feel, and I don’t like being around people who are on it.

      But I really don’t like spending tax dollars to imprison people because we don’t like what they choose to put in their own bodies. I really don’t like the violent, dangerous, invasive policing practices that become necessary when we try to control what people put in their bodies. I really don’t like the black markets and criminal organizations that grow and profit when drug use is criminalized.

      I think Washington and Colorado have made a fiscally-, pragmatically-, and morally-sound choice and I oppose any candidate who would take that choice away from us. I may not like smelling weed every time I walk outside in Seattle, but I like it a whole lot more than the alternative.

      • mrmiller

        Agreed. Although I live in Colorado and can’t remember the last time I smelled weed on the streets. On the other hand, downtown Colorado Springs on a Sat. night carries that overwhelming odor of vomit, piss and alcohol.

      • HotTuna

        And that’s from the sober residents.

      • mrmiller

        The patriotic and REAL christian sober residents.

    • noah vail

      figures don’t lie, but liars figure

    • Cemetery Girl

      I have never even tried it, but I still suport legalization. Tax sales (just like alcohol and tobacco) increasing revenue and spend the DEA budget (which a majority is spent on fighting pot) on drugs like meth and heroin.

      • HotTuna

        Why shouldn’t people be free to do meth or heroin if they want?

        Are you some kind of fascist?

  • OMGface

    For me, the real and terrifying issue is he was self deluded enough to ever actually think he had any kinda shot at the nomination begin with!

  • brian nunziato

    Christie isn’t going to the White House… he’s going to the Big House.

  • Cemetery Girl

    While I have never even tried marihuana I still favor legalizing it. It can introduce new tax revenue, instead of spending taxes on the criminalization of marihuana. Alcohol prohibition was passed in 1919. It did not take decades to see that the expense of Prohibition and the escalation of criminal activity in relation to providing illegal booze was not worth the measure. DEA spends more resources pursuing marihuana than any other drug. I would much rather have my tax money directed towards things like meth and heroin.

  • Al Johnson

    He can’t even manage his waist line, how in the hell can he manage a country …

  • Obesity — especially morbid obesity — is a Mental Illness.

  • toma kay

    He’ll never make it through the front door

  • billyjobob

    He should be on the big loser.

  • John Coughlan

    He couldn’t run down the block

  • Brian

    Small government! (except when it’s about something I disagree with)