The “Facebook Privacy Notice” Is False, Please Stop Posting It

Facebook hoaxOnce again, the “Facebook Privacy Notice” has gone viral, even though it has been debunked for years now. Facebook even responded with a message back in 2012 which addressed the false rumor that claimed by uploading to Facebook, users basically forfeited their rights.

It’s kind of scary to some people, the idea that their personal information could be used by Facebook without their consent, and that’s what the people who originally started this urban legend were probably counting on.

In case you haven’t noticed, there are a lot of gullible folks on Facebook, and almost every single one of us has that one friend or family member who shares stuff from NationalReport.net, DuffelBlog.com – or believes that Christians For Michele Bachmann is a legitimate conservative page. Spoiler alert: it is what’s known as a “poe” page.

Anyhow, here’s the fake Facebook Privacy Notice, just in case you don’t have any friends who fail to fact-check before posting stuff online:

Due to the fact that Facebook has chosen to involve software that will allow the theft of my personal information, I state: at this date of January 4, 2015, in response to the new guidelines of Facebook, pursuant to articles L.111, 112 and 113 of the code of intellectual property, I declare that my rights are attached to all my personal data drawings, paintings, photos, video, texts etc. published on my profile and my page. For commercial use of the foregoing my written consent is required at all times.Those who read this text can do a copy/paste on their Facebook wall. This will allow them to place themselves under the protection of copyright. By this statement, I tell Facebook that it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, broadcast, or take any other action against me on the basis of this profile and or its content. The actions mentioned above also apply to employees, students, agents and or other personnel under the direction of Facebook.

The content of my profile contains private information. The violation of my privacy is punishable by law (UCC 1-308 1-308 1-103 and the Rome Statute).

Facebook is now an open capital entity. All members are invited to publish a notice of this kind, or if they prefer, you can copy and paste this version.

If you have not published this statement at least once, you tacitly allow the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in the profile update. (Source)

Regardless of political affiliation, way too many people subscribe to the idea “they can’t put anything on the internet that isn’t true” that was the subject of a humorous State Farm commercial from 2012 as well.

If you are concerned about the Facebook privacy of images, videos or status updates you post to the site or elsewhere on social media, here’s a tip: don’t do it. While there are customizable Facebook privacy options that allow you to restrict who can and cannot see what you post, there are ways for people to get around those restrictions if they’re determined enough. Also, don’t comment on a local news channel or other public Facebook page if you think your employer might not approve of you making statements that reflect badly on them. While it’s always a good idea not to list your employer for all to see, all it takes is a few minutes on Google or other search sites to find out where you work or where you live.

There are indeed ways to secure your privacy on the internet, but copying and pasting the “Facebook Privacy Notice” is not one of them.



Comments

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  • Nancy B

    I have a Facebook friend who fancies herself as a writer who appends a copyright statement to every post she makes, even if she’s just posting about the weather. She’s been doing it for years. Drives me nuts.

  • Emily_Hutton

    Why, oh why – do people betray their children’s privacy on Facebook?

    I have a Facebook “friend” who is constantly posting daily pictures of her young daughter and informing thousands of “friends” everything her daughter is up to – including potty training! The poor child has no privacy. Her foolish mother’s need for Facebook “likes” and attention, have robbed her child of any dignity and privacy. Parents who do this betray their children because the silly attention seeking photos will be in cyberworld forever, whether the poor child likes it, or not. How selfish for parents to do this to their own children.

    Furthermore, if parents have no self control on social media, how do they expect their children to handle it when they get on Facebook?

  • Brandywine_River

    Why do grown @ss women, with children, post selfies in their bikinis with balloon sized fake boobs? What’s going to happen when their children get onto Facebook? When Mommy is such a cheap tart she can’t tell her daughter to have any class. Parents set the worst possible example to their children on Facebook. That’s my rant.