Here’s Why Giving the Death Penalty to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is the Wrong Thing to Do

bostonAs most have heard by now, a jury sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death stemming from his conviction relating to the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013. Naturally this has sparked quite the heated debate among many people, mostly focused on the moral implications relating to those who support the death penalty vs. those who don’t.


Personally, I go back and forth on how I feel about the death penalty. Many stats show that after all the appeals and the legal games are played, executing someone ends up costing taxpayers more than simply giving someone life without parole. Then again, does someone found guilty of a heinous crime deserve to live?

I’ve always said that the death penalty should be a punishment only given to someone in a case where the evidence is absolutely indisputable. If any portion of the case if based on circumstantial evidence, then I don’t believe the death penalty should ever be an option.

But I always come back to wondering how many innocent people have been executed. Is the death penalty really worth it if even one innocent person is wrongfully executed? To those who unequivocally support the death penalty, if it was your mother, father, brother or sister who was wrongfully put to death, and evidence later proved that they were innocent, would you still support it?

That being said, I understand why many feel Tsarnaev deserves to die. He’s an Islamic radical who helped carry out one of the worst terrorist attacks on U.S. soil.

But I can’t emphasize enough how stupid it is to sentence Tsarnaev to death. Not because I feel he doesn’t deserve death (in this case I feel he does), but because that’s giving Islamic radicals exactly what they want – a famous martyr killed at the hands of the U.S. government and our judicial system.

Now, some believe Tsarnaev wants to die, but I’m not so sure about that. I think if he really wanted to die he would have let himself get taken down by law enforcement officials two years ago instead of hiding inside of a boat in someone’s backyard like a coward.

While I know not everyone will agree with me, I think supporting his execution is just incredibly short-sighted. Every Islamic terrorist that knows of Tsarnaev and what’s going on here is hoping he’s put to death. After all, what better recruitment tool is there for these people than the United States sentencing one of their own to death? It’s the exact kind of high-profile death for which these monsters hope. And here we now have millions of Americans supporting a move that will actually help their recruitment and propaganda.


It makes absolutely no sense.

When a group of bottom-feeders see dying “for their cause” as an honor, the last thing anyone should want is to give them what they want. In my opinion, Tsarnaev should have been given life without parole, locked away in some tiny cell isolated from the world, rotting away into obscurity for the next several decades until ultimately dying of some sort of natural cause.

That way his death would be nothing more than a footnote to a normal day many years from now, instead of a possible recruitment tool for Islamic radicals.



Allen Clifton

Allen Clifton is a native Texan who now lives in the Austin area. He has a degree in Political Science from Sam Houston State University. Allen is a co-founder of Forward Progressives and creator of the popular Right Off A Cliff column and Facebook page. Be sure to follow Allen on Twitter and Facebook, and subscribe to his channel on YouTube as well.

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  • aka Eric Blair

    Yes, we’re just opening another can of worms by giving him the death penalty. Rotting in obscurity is much more fitting.

  • PrinceAshitaka

    good post, For pro.

  • marysrn

    50-60 years in a supermax prison, like that in Florence,CO, with no chance for parole, no other human contact, no radio, no TV, no newspapers, no books, only a Christian bible to read, an hour a week outside all alone, sounds just about right to me.

  • GL

    You missed the other major point: There’s going to be appeals of the sentence. Dozens of them. It’ll take many, many years, and they’ll keep ripping the wounds he created open, allowing them to fester. It ignores that one crucial fact about the death penalty: It forces the victims of a crime to relive it over and over through countless court cases, denying them a chance to heal.