I Am A Southerner And The Confederate Flag Doesn’t Represent Me

(Buyenlarge Archive Photos via Getty Images) A Confederate flag at an anti-integration rally in Little Rock in 1959.

(Buyenlarge Archive Photos via Getty Images)
A Confederate flag at an anti-integration rally in Little Rock in 1959.

I grew up in rural western Virginia back in the 80s and 90s, surrounded by many of the battlefields and other historical sites from the Civil War. Up and down through the green fields and small villages of the Shenandoah Valley, both Union and Confederate soldiers fought and died until the guns finally fell silent 150 years ago. At the Battle of New Market, cadets as young as 15 from Lexington’s Virginia Military Institute charged across a field into a maelstrom of musket and cannon fire. I was born in Lexington, Virginia in a hospital named after Confederate general Stonewall Jackson and my father taught at VMI briefly. Studying military history and strategies, especially from the Civil War has been a hobby of mine since I was very young – but I utterly detest the Confederate battle flag.


The Shenandoah Valley sits on the northern edge of the Bible Belt, and people who weren’t white and Christian were nearly unheard of when I was growing up. It was the source of much community gossip when a Jewish family from New York bought a nearby farm and decided to trade in the busy lifestyle of the big city for an organic farming experience with their three sons. It was an absolute scandal when Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross set up her facility in the area and planned to adopt infants who had AIDS. In 1994, a suspicious fire destroyed her center and while arson was believed to be the cause, nobody in the community would say a word and local law enforcement didn’t seem very interested in finding a culprit either. People praised Jesus that her work, considered by many to be witchcraft or even Satanic, was completely destroyed. In that same county, there wasn’t a single black resident, and it was an unspoken rule that they weren’t exactly welcome there.

As for the Confederate flag, it wasn’t something that was commonly displayed as I remember, but it was present at various historical sites and on the back of rusted pickup trucks parked at the local high school. Some schools and hospitals still bear the names of Confederate generals like Robert E. Lee or Stonewall Jackson, and until 2000, Martin Luther King Day was celebrated as Lee-Jackson-King Day instead. To this day, I still remember our local mail carrier saying, “I wish they would shoot four more (racial epithet) so I could have the whole week off,” in regards to Martin Luther King Day which he saw as an insult to the memories of two Confederate generals. While Virginia seems to have had the lowest number of lynchings that plagued the South during the Jim Crow Era, the racism and resentment toward the end of segregation was still there – and the Confederate battle flag represents all of that. It is a flag that even Robert E. Lee, the commanding general of the defeated Confederate Army, wanted to distance himself from after the war.

Lee did not want such divisive symbols following him to the grave. At his funeral in 1870, flags were notably absent from the procession. Former Confederate soldiers marching did not don their old military uniforms, and neither did the body they buried. “His Confederate uniform would have been ‘treason’ perhaps!” Lee’s daughter wrote.

So sensitive was Lee during his final years with extinguishing the fiery passions of the Civil War that he opposed erecting monuments on the battlefields where the Southern soldiers under his command had fought against the Union. “I think it wiser moreover not to keep open the sores of war, but to follow the examples of those nations who endeavoured to obliterate the marks of civil strife and to commit to oblivion the feelings it engendered,” he wrote. (Source)

The display of the Confederate flag, especially on government property, isn’t about remembering the soldiers and the history that came with the bloodiest conflict in American history. While some people will argue that it is about “heritage not hate,” it stands more as symbol of defiance towards the federal government, and often as a tacit reminder to blacks that while the South may have lost the war, the white man is still ultimately in charge.


As many writers have pointed out since the recent debate over the Confederate flag began, the main flag of the CSA wasn’t the one that you see today. In fact, the current “Stars and Bars” was relegated mostly to museums and memorial events until the end of segregation was in sight and groups like the KKK resurrected the flag to signify white resistance to a changing America – something it still represents today.

When Southern states gave the flags pride of place in their capitols, it was to signal support for segregation. The same Georgia state legislature that considered closing the state’s schools rather than integrating them also changed the state flag to include the Confederate symbol. Alabama Governor George Wallace — who promised to fight for “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever” — began flying the Confederate flag when Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy came to Alabama in 1963 to discuss integrating the state’s universities. The South Carolina state Capitol began flying the flag in 1962 and never stopped. (Source)

The Confederate flag, like the flags of apartheid-era South Africa and white-ruled Rhodesia that the Charleston shooter wore, still serves as a refusal to accept an America where a man of black heritage is the leader of the free world. That flag states an unwillingness to see people of other skin colors, religions and cultures as equals – regardless of what apologists may say to the contrary.

I am a Southerner by birth and I’ve lived in the South all of my life. I love black-eyed peas, collard greens, corn bread and nothing compares to the sound of the blues as played by someone from the Mississippi Delta. I assume that if you offer me iced tea that it has sugar in it and the only real barbecue is a hog, cooked low and slow and served with an East Carolina vinegar-based sauce, washed down with a cold bottle of Cheerwine. I grew up knowing what a “holler” is and for my seventh birthday, I received a .22 rifle as a present. I can skin a deer, make a roux, and shuck oysters about as fast as you can eat them. These are all things that I’ve learned growing up south of the Mason-Dixon Line, but hate isn’t one of them.

The Confederate flag is not part of my heritage, even though I have relatives who fought and died for what they believed to be their God-given, constitutional right to own slaves. I see it as being something that belongs in a museum, as a shameful reminder of our nation’s past, and the people who still embrace the hatred which should have died generations ago.

“If you can convince the lowest white man that he’s better than the best colored man, he won’t notice you’re picking his pocket. Hell, give him somebody to look down on, and he’ll even empty his pockets for you.”- President Lyndon B. Johnson



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  • John_St_John

    Well written piece Manny Schewitz and something that needs to be said and heard.

  • lovelydestruction

    I agree. Its disingenuous to claim pride of heritage while whitewashing a hateful, devisive rag that never stood for anything but the superiority of white men. Conversation’s over.

  • Charles Vincent
    • BB-Mystic

      So? That still doesn’t mean we shouldn’t get rid of the flag now.

      • Je’ Czaja

        Why not? Should we keep it around a while longer? How much longer? When would be the right time?

      • BB-Mystic

        Seeing as racial hatred is what it’s come to symbolize, I would say no. It’s the same thing that happened to the swastika in Europe. That’s actually a very old symbol, predating the Nazis; but with what it’s now been linked to, nobody wants anything to do with it, and rightfully so.

      • Clydene Cannon

        The right time to get rid of it was 150 years ago.

      • Charles Vincent

        Why? Because you don’t like it? Well tough you don’t get to tell others what they can like and in this case flying that flag is protected speech so deal with it.

        And on a bigger picture manny claims the it represents racism and the republican bigotry, which to me is funny since the party line is democrats aren’t bigoted and or insensitive. I would guess that both you and manny voted Clinton twice and will vote Hillary in ’16. Regardless of the fact they used that very symbol to frame bills run. And as Hillary stated in the letter highlighted in red. This would make you and manny both ignorant an hypocritical, along with the rest or the democratic caucus. And that my friend is my point.

      • BB-Mystic

        Well, let’s see. As we speak, the South Carolina legislature passed an amendment on allowing debate about removing the flag from the Capitol grounds.

        http://fox6now.com/2015/06/23/south-carolina-house-voted-103-10-to-remove-confederate-flag-from-capitol-grounds-senate-vote-next/

        If the legislature votes to remove it (and South Carolina’s governor, Nikki Haley, has called for them to do so) then out it goes.

        You’re certainly free to fly the flag on your property if you wish (though, in my opinion, it makes you a right asshole to do so). That has nothing to do with whether or not state governments and institutions fly it.

        Of course Bill Clinton made an idiotic blunder in using it for his election. That’s the whole point. Due to what it now symbolizes, NO ONE should use it, Democrat or Republican.

      • Charles Vincent

        That doesn’t make it constitutional.

        RE your second and third paragraph.
        It is certainly that states prerogative to do so since states are sovereign. My personal beliefs are irrelevant, what is relevant is that I choose to defend freedom of speech regardless of whether or not I agree with whats being said.

        Re your last paragraph
        So your saying that the rebel flag wasn’t associated with the same things when Clinton ran?
        “NO ONE should use it, Democrat or Republican.”
        This is your opinion and that’s fine but you still don’t get to suppress others rights to do it whether you like it or not.

      • BB-Mystic

        Charles, it seems to me you’re getting all worked up over something nobody has said.

        Nobody has said that individuals don’t have the right to display the Confederate flag if they wish. You [meaning you personally] can stick it in your window, hoist it over your house, and even paint it on the roof of your car if you want to. Of course, doing so makes you look like an ignorant jackass, and I think you know that. But you can still legally display it.

        The current kerfluffle is over the state of South Carolina continuing to fly the flag on the Capitol grounds. That flag has only been there since 1962, and it’s been fought over for decades. The call to remove it certainly didn’t date from just this week, although it’s disgusting, and terribly sad, that the deaths of nine people at the hands of an admitted racist might have finally provided the impetus to do so.

        http://www.wltx.com/story/news/2015/06/22/history-of-the-confederate-flag-at-the-state-house/29130453/

        It was also flown as a response to the civil rights movement.

        “This was a symbol of pushback on the part of white South Carolina leaders,” David Goldfield, Professor of history at the University of North Carolina and author of Still Fighting the Civil War, told ABC News.

        Goldfield said the thinking behind the decision to fly the flag was “we’re going to put this flag in your face because we’re against race-mixing.”

        Source: http://abcnews.go.com/US/confederate-flags-flies-south-carolina-debate-continues-symbol/story?id=31892710

        So: the initial decision to display it in 1962 is dubious, to say the least.

        Bottom line: does the state of South Carolina have the right to remove this flag, or do they not? If they do, what are you fussing about?

      • Charles Vincent

        You yourself said it in this very conversation.
        “Seeing as racial hatred is what it’s come to symbolize, I would say no. It’s the same thing that happened to the swastika in Europe. That’s actually a very old symbol, predating the Nazis; but with what it’s now been linked to, nobody wants anything to do with it, and rightfully so.”

        And here

        “NO ONE should use it, Democrat or Republican.”

      • BB-Mystic

        Oh, don’t be ridiculous. SHOULD doesn’t mean CAN’T, and my opinion doesn’t have the force of law.
        The force of public shame, however, is a powerful thing.

      • Charles Vincent

        Sounds a bit like you’re equivocating. Your opinion may not have the force of law but empirical evidence shows that people like you appeal to government to make laws that force others to abide by your standards. This practice is morally wrong when it attempts to force another individual to do something against his will when he has done nothing that damages your person, property or liberty.

      • BB-Mystic

        Why would anybody need to pass a law when public outrage can get the job done just as well?

        Amazon and Ebay, for example, just yanked Confederate-themed merchandise from their websites.

        http://www.cnet.com/news/ebay-bans-sales-of-confederate-flags-related-items/

        Walmart, Sears and Kmart did as well.

        http://news.yahoo.com/walmart-pulls-confederate-flag-merchandise-charleston-attack-030340784.html

        The free market at work, you know. Are you going to complain about that too?

        Public pressure also caused South Carolina’s governor Nikki Haley to reverse course and call for the flag’s removal.

        http://www.dailydot.com/politics/south-carolina-confederate-flag-statehouse-nikki-haley/

        That’s the great thing about public outrage (and admittedly, this incident seems to be something of a flashpoint). It can apply to any issue, from any side. Open Carry advocates and anti-abortion protestors prove this point quite well.

        This practice is morally wrong when it attempts to force another individual to do something against his will when he has done nothing that damages your person, property or liberty.

        Do you apply this principle when it comes to people who want to ban abortion and force women to give birth against their will?

      • Charles Vincent

        “Do you apply this principle when it comes to people who want to ban abortion and force women to give birth against their will?”

        I’ve never appealed to any government to subvert a woman’s right to make those decisions. Are ther caveats yes and I stated them and you’ve commented on them here on articles on that subject. I’ve also clearly stated that I think there are valid reasons to have an abortion. Do I think women should when carrying the baby to term and adopting it out it a couple who can’t have a child is morally a better decision yes. Do I appeal to government to force that opinion on others no and that’s the difference between you and I.

      • Charles Vincent

        “Bottom line: does the state of South Carolina have the right to remove this flag, or do they not? If they do, what are you fussing about?”

        The problem is this look at the incident with several professors and students how petitioned to have the U.S. Flag removed from display at UC Irvine because it symbolized racism. One point is where do you draw the line. And secondly laws operate in the gray area so if they pass a law will it be specific or ambiguous.

      • BB-Mystic

        …aaaand you still didn’t answer the question.

        Does the legislature of South Carolina have the right to vote to remove the flag or not? The governor of Alabama just ordered the Confederate flag removed from the grounds. Did he have the legal right to do that or not?

        Yes or no.

      • Charles Vincent

        Already answered tha several replies back.

        “RE your second and third paragraph.
        It is certainly that states prerogative to do so since states are sovereign. My personal beliefs are irrelevant, what is relevant is that I choose to defend freedom of speech regardless of whether or not I agree with whats being said.”

        I also linked an article on why I think laws of this nature are bad.

        Here is an example of why what your talking about can go off the rails.
        http://campusreform.org/?ID=63

      • BB-Mystic

        And? According to the article, that was passed by “the Associated Students of University of California, Irvine,” and ended up being canceled by the organization’s Executive Cabinet anyway, due to the negative publicity. As far as I can tell, it would have applied only to the UC Irvine campus. (And not even the entire campus, if I’m reading the article right–just an “inclusive space” in the “ASUCI lobby”!)

        What does that have to do with passing a state or federal law?

      • Charles Vincent

        It failed yes but that’s not the point, the point is it was attempted. Understand?
        “(And not even the entire campus, if I’m reading the article right–just an “inclusive space” in the “ASUCI lobby”!)”
        Where or in what space it’s allowed is akin to having free speech zones in certain places because you want to curb what people say and where they say it.

        I don’t really care if they remove the flag. I just don’t think is for the state legislature to do something of this sort should be a referendum where the citizens of the state vote yea or nay.

      • BB-Mystic

        You’re very good at dodging question.

        To repeat: What does your little story have to do with passing an actual state or federal law?

      • Charles Vincent

        Open your eyes I answered your question don’t pretend I didn’t.

      • BB-Mystic

        So if your story has nothing to do with an actual legislative act, it’s rather a piss-poor, irrelevant “example,” isn’t it? I mean, you’re wasting my time arguing about stuff that a) never went anywhere, and b) never had the force of law to begin with.

      • Charles Vincent

        Well that’s your opinion. And I never consider anything I do as a waste of time. Why you ask? Simple because I always learn something new and that is never a waste of time.

      • lovelydestruction

        all kinds of bullshit is “attempted”. So what?

      • Charles Vincent

        CNN reports people wanting to remove the Jefferson memorial from Washington because he owned slave. That’s from CNN. you see how asinine the whole ordeal really is and how out of hand its getting.

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        free speech Charles. I thought you were in favor of that. Oh that’s right, only right wing nutjob expressions of ‘speech’

      • Charles Vincent

        There is a distinct difference between speaking and active action to use government force to achieve your moral goal while supplanting others moral goals.

      • lovelydestruction

        people “attempt” all sorts of bullshit. Understand?

      • Charles Vincent

        That remains to be seen.

      • lovelydestruction

        Pffft. No leg to stand on.

      • Charles Vincent

        Here is an example of why what your talking about can go off the rails.
        http://campusreform.org/?ID=6349

      • lovelydestruction

        that will never get off the ground and you know it.

      • Corbin

        That’s exactly what I would have said about the Battle flag ten days ago.

      • Charles Vincent

        You have a crystal ball? or some mutant gene that lets you divine the future?

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        Charles really loves his racist symbols. He’s afraid that if the symbol is outlawed, he will have to buy all new clothes because more than half of his raggedy shirts have the symbol on them, even though he doesn’t live in the south. What a sad existence he leads.

      • Clydene Cannon

        A bigot doesn’t have to live in the south. They move or believe what someone told them to believe.

      • lovelydestruction

        Well, nobody is trying to “outlaw” it, so I really don’t know what his problem is.

      • BB-Mystic

        He just wants his “free speech” without consequences. They always do.

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        Strom Thurmond’s SON, and State Senator, Paul Thurmond disagrees with you. I suggest you look up and LISTEN to his speech on the floor today. Seems like you have a lot of time on your hands. Wow, you know you are out there when people like him call the flag a symbol of ‘racism and bigotry’ and you disagree. Hmmmm…what is it like to be you, Charles?

      • Charles Vincent

        Its his opinion and he is free to say that but it doesn’t change the fact that its speech and covered by the first amendment.

        “Wow, you know you are out there when people like him call the flag a
        symbol of ‘racism and bigotry’ and you disagree. Hmmmm…what is it
        like to be you, Charles?”

        Nice hasty generalization there chief. You don’t understand that I am supporting free speech regardless of the message of said speech

      • Clydene Cannon

        Yes, Strom’s son was speaking with his lips…..not flying a foreign flag. Does that flag have lips to talk to you? You’re mixing up apples and oranges. But, let’s get down to what that flag does speak to. Look up what the founders said about what that flag stands for…..that blacks are inferior to whites…..yes, my uninformed friend, it does stand for that.

      • Charles Vincent

        “Gregory Lee Johnson burned an American flag outside of the convention
        center where the 1984 Republican National Convention was being held in
        Dallas, Texas. Johnson burned the flag to protest the policies of
        President Ronald Reagan. He was arrested and charged with violating a
        Texas statute that prevented the desecration of a venerated object,
        including the American flag, if such action were likely to incite anger
        in others. A Texas court tried and convicted Johnson. He appealed,
        arguing that his actions were “symbolic speech” protected by the First
        Amendment. The Supreme Court agreed to hear his case.”
        Facts and case summary for Texas v. Johnson, 491 U.S. 397 (1989). Flag burning constitutes symbolic speech that is protected by the First Amendment.

        Likewise displaying the flag is considered free speech.

        ” Look up what the founders said about what that flag stands for…..that
        blacks are inferior to whites…..yes, my uninformed friend, it does
        stand for that.”

        What it stands for is irrelevant its protected as free speech.

        “In 1977 Frank Collin, the leader of National Socialist Party of America, announced the party’s intention to march through Skokie, Illinois. In the predominantly Jewish community, one in six residents was a Holocaust survivor[citation needed]. Originally, the NSPA had planned a political rally in Marquette Park in Chicago;
        however the Chicago authorities blocked these plans by requiring the
        NSPA to post a public safety insurance bond and by banning political
        demonstrations in Marquette Park.

        On behalf of the NSPA, the ACLU challenged the injunction issued by the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois that prohibited marchers at the proposed Skokie rally from wearing Nazi uniforms or displaying swastikas. The ACLU was represented by civil rights attorney Burton Joseph.[1][2] The challengers argued that the injunction violated the First Amendment rights of the marchers to express themselves.”
        National Socialist Party of America v. Village of Skokie

      • lovelydestruction

        so what? wear the flag, paint it on your face, plant it in your butt and wave it proudly….free speech.
        Place it on statehouse grounds?Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.

      • Corbin

        It is on the Confederate Soldier Memorial. What flag would you suggest be there?

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        The white flag.

      • Charles Vincent

        So we all need to live according you your moral compass then?

      • Clydene Cannon

        Yes, you can burn your Confederate Flag. And, you can quote other cases but lets see how far your free speech goes in this case. You lose, fella, it’s not an American Flag or State Flag. None of your arguments apply! Actually, it’s a really dumb thing to display the Nazi symbol or the Confederate Flag as it is a clear message of what you stand for and patriotic Americans will shun you for it. Your free speech is: My flag stands for not being part of a State in the Union and I prefer slavery over freedom…….Say that all you want to but I’m pretty sure you are in the minority as far as that free speech goes. Free speech has it’s limits. You can’t yell fire in a crowed theater because of the harm you can do to others. I’d say your flag has done enough harm already.

      • Corbin

        You make a huge leap to assume those who fly the St Andrews Cross are not loyal Americans and Patriots. The Battle flag does not cause harm, its a flag, it cant attack or wound anybody, so the Theatre analogy doesn’t work. Like it or not, its free speech.

      • Charles Vincent

        You missed the part about flags being considered symbols chief they are protected speech.

      • Corbin

        We. Don’t. Care. Its not 1860. Slavery is dead and no longer an issue, except when the left brings it up. No one alive experienced it. You don’t want to fly the Battle flag, don’t. I’ll fly mine.

      • Clydene Cannon

        We’ll, I and others in America CARE! Your flag represents slavery and always has. Those who fly it think they have the right to kill innocent people or tell the rest of us we are wrong for caring about those innocent people. Strom Thurmon was very prejudiced, hateful person so it shows that his son can think for himself and come to a rational conclusion regarding that flag.

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        and you aren’t fighting in a war for the Southern traitors, so why wave that ridiculous flag? Or do you think there is still a war going on somewhere because if so, we need to send US troops to your house and disarm or take you out.

      • Corbin

        Its quite nice to have something you can be proud of. Maybe someday you will as well. And who cares what Strom Thurmond’s son says about anything? Isn’t he the son of a Dem racist?

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        You’ve gone off the rails Corbin. Please don’t go around terrorizing old ladies and children today because of your blind hatred of the United States and the people who live here. Please lay off of Rush’s short and curlies for a day or two. Try reality for a while. It’s not so bad.

      • Clydene Cannon

        Did you not read what she said…..it’s become to be known for racial hatred….so you are telling her you like racial hatred. At least we know where your coming from. Flying a foreign flag is not covered under free speech laws. When I last checked, free speech pertains to the freedoms of U. S. citizens. If you choose to fly a foreign flag and give your preference to it rather than the free state of SC and the American Flag, I see you are also ignorant and hypocritical and likely would not prefer that the black citizens are free along with the rest of us. That’s double talk!

      • Charles Vincent

        SCOTUS already called it free speech in a case and Texas got served by them as well in the 80’s read my other post to you.

      • lovelydestruction

        OK…you are correct that I am not allowed to bitchslap individuals for promoting symbols that I don’t like. I love free speech, but a racist symbol on statehouse grounds isn’t that.

      • Charles Vincent

        If the people want it there it is and SCOTUS already stated that things like flags are Free speech.

      • Corbin

        You sure are assuming a lot by someone flying a flag. Did Clinton wearing it make him a proponent of slavery? Of course not, to Southerners its a symbol of our region. To make the leap that flying it is the same as calling for a return to slavery is simply absurd.

      • Clydene Cannon

        Got any more excuses. “a symbol of our region”….your region is bound by jurisdictions….states. The Mason Dixon Line does not exist any more…..no jurisdictions or laws apply separately to the region below the MDL. By your standards or thinking then I can fly the Mexican FLag on the grounds of the AZ State Capitol as that was a Mexican region in history and we still have lots of Mexican citizens here. Your argument simply does not hold up.

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        you should probably understand what everyone else thinks of that silly flag. It has always stood for racism whether your mommy taught you that or not. You might think it makes you part of a club, and it does. A racist club.

        Just an FYI, in the future you should teach your children what EVERYONE thinks of that symbol and why it’s viewed that way so they don’t make the silly choices you’ve made.

      • lovelydestruction

        So what? Nobody is saying you can’t buy one and fly one, wear it head to toe, or whatever. The rest of us don’t want it flying on statehouse grounds or federal land.
        We’re all free to believe any fantasy we concoct.

      • Charles Vincent

        “The rest of us don’t want it flying on statehouse grounds or federal land.”
        It actually isn’t the rest of “us”

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fD5JRPV0W7Y

      • Clydene Cannon

        It’s a foreign flag…..soon you won’t be able to buy one of them anywhere!

      • Corbin

        Right. Like you cant buy cocain. I’ll just have to buy made in China. Free markets will fill the void.

      • Clydene Cannon

        Black market??? cocaine??? We’re talking about a flag. “Free” related to China is a misuse of that word and ridiculous. China might make them and ship them but if no one puts them in the stores where you gonna buy them.

    • Creeayshun Sighuntist
      • lovelydestruction

        Huh, that’s interesting. No union label + no state identification = not designed or produced by the Clinton/Gore campaign.
        I thought that seemed suspicious…seemed like a losing tactic.

    • lovelydestruction
      • Charles Vincent

        Someone beat you to it sorry its why I let it go earlier.

    • Creeayshun Sighuntist

      LOL….why do you believe every right wing lie? Haahaha…what is it like to be that naive?

      • Charles Vincent

        Well I don’t believe lies. Why do you consistantly believe the lies politicos vomit from their collective mouths?

      • Corbin

        How does it feel to spout so much useless nonsense?

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        Please look in the mirror and ask yourself that first before you look anymore stupid.

  • Hildabeast

    Just a typical knee jerk liberal reaction when something bad happens.We have to something even if it is not relevant to the situation.Had that flag not been flying that nutcase would have still shot those people.

    • lovelydestruction

      When is it appropriate for you then?
      The call is symbolic of a consensus that the Dixie flag represents guilelessly obnoxious white-superiority claims. Like a wink and a nudge.

      • Charles Vincent

        Maybe when the first amendment is removed from the constitution. Considering that flying a flag is protected as free speech that is.

      • lovelydestruction

        Sorry. You lost. Why should the rest of us glorify white supremacy?

      • Charles Vincent

        Did I say anything about you? No. I said it’s freedom of speech and protected under the first amendment. You are free to agree or disagree, you are however not free to stop others who wish to do so.

      • lovelydestruction

        Doesn’t seem shitty to me, but I’m white and can get married in any state in the Union or have an abortion, so maybe I’m biased.

      • Charles Vincent

        Way to side step the point, and ignore how stupid the question you asked was.

      • lovelydestruction

        OK I’m so sad now

      • Charles Vincent

        Sucks to be you.

      • lovelydestruction

        I like me…i don’t like people who insist that America has to back up racist bullshit

      • Charles Vincent

        What I insist on is that people respect the right of others to speak on what they choose. You’re free to disagree with them and to associate with others that also disagree like you. You are however not free to force others to live how you see fit according to your moral or ethical code.

      • lovelydestruction

        You have a right to voice your opinion. I have a right to voice mine. You seem to equate free speech with state speech, which it isn’t.

      • Charles Vincent

        Tread my discussion with BBMystic on this thread concerning your assumption.

      • lovelydestruction

        ok, let’s move the discussion over there

      • Corbin

        No one is asking you to glorify anything. We would settle for you minding your own business.

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        stfu redneck dipshit and go crawl back under the rock you came from.

      • PRIME79

        Stop crying about the 1A. No one is saying the flag cant be flown any where at all jackass, fly it at your house, on your car, clothes, or your business all you want. But the flag of people that fought against the US government has no business flying on US government grounds. Besides, the only confederate flag that really matters is the white one they waved….unconditional surrender….Ha! Ha! Ha!

      • Charles Vincent

        “NO ONE should use it, Democrat or Republican.”

        And

        “Seeing as racial hatred is what it’s come to symbolize, I would say no. It’s the same thing that happened to the swastika in Europe. That’s actually a very old symbol, predating the Nazis; but with what it’s now been linked to, nobody wants anything to do with it, and rightfully so.”
        Courtesy of BBmystic right on this very thread and also echoed on a differnt article in this sight on the same topic by another poster.

        Furthermore it’s not U.S. government property it’s sc state property.

      • Clydene Cannon

        I love your humor…..good point since the Civil War took more lives than all the wars fought by America combined. That’s a staggering number. At any rate, I have another point. The Confederate Flag was a battle flag of a foreign nation. Remember the South did leave the States to form a new nation. But they lost the War. Oh, wait, Texas, NM, AZ, CO and California flew the Mexican Flag but Mexico lost. So, with this crazy Southern logic, I presume it’s A-OK for those states to fly the foreign flag of Mexico at their State capitol buildings. And, Louisiana could fly the French flag??? It’s simple, the loser is not allowed to fly a foreign flag over government land they lost in a war. That’s the reason but it might be over their head to think they could understand such a simple concept.

      • lovelydestruction

        “…the only confederate flag that really matters is the white one they waved….unconditional surrender”

        Nice

      • Corbin

        Yes, belittling such a tragic war is quite hilarious. It just makes me feel we did not kill enough of you Yankees at the time. We just ran out of troops and bullets. Too bad.

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        is that you Dylann Roof? I didn’t know you could get internet access in jail. Hopefully you will be put in a cell with the biggest and angriest black man in the system and see just how tough you are.

      • Corbin

        It wasn’t on US government grounds in any of these cases, bright boy. It was on a Confederate Soldier Memorial on state owned property, the way most state memorials are on state property. But the MSM fails to mention that fact, since it don’t fit in with the PC nazis agenda. And when the War is really over, we will let you know.

      • Creeayshun Sighuntist

        Just an FYI, it is over and you lost. It’s too bad small town nitwits like you can’t figure it out and consequently spawn children who are just as dumb as you are. It might be time to send drones into your area to liberate your state from terrorists like you.

    • Creeayshun Sighuntist

      Nicki Haley is now a liberal? Wow…that is news.

  • Clydene Cannon

    What the heck freedom of speech is Charles Vincent talking about??? Flying a foreign flag over government property is what we’re talking about here regardless of whether the Confederate War Flag has become the flag of a minority of people in the South who are hateful and bitter because Blacks became free citizens. The State Flag of SC is not the Confederate Flag. The victor chooses the Flag…..not the loser. Just plain and simple logic. Flying a foreign flag (CWF) has nothing to do with free speech or the Constitution. The Constitution does not protect or defend a foreign flag. Just a little bit of commons sense….Please! Manny’s article was excellent.