Losing Liberal Lockstep, or Why Stealing From The GOP Playbook Is Bad

I sure as heck am a liberal. Politically, ideologically, and definitely socially. It’s that last part that gives me trouble these days, though. Not because of my opponents; most of those can’t debate their way out of a wet paper bag, and depend on sites like Drudge and Fox News for their slanted data. Anyone who sticks their head down that hole has no effect on me. No, the problem is among those on my own side… or who at least claim to be.

I guess what it all comes down to, for me, is that social liberalism was once an alternative that enabled people to pursue whatever types of consensual personal behavior they wanted, and thus was a movement that increased individual freedom and happiness. It was the antidote to Jerry Fallwell telling you that you were going to hell, to Nancy Reagan saying “just say no,” to your conservative parents telling you to choose not to be gay, to Pat Robertson saying don’t have sex, to Tipper Gore telling you that you couldn’t listen to the music you like, to don’t wear those clothes, don’t walk that way, don’t have fun, don’t be yourself. So, of course, that movement won. It was a positive, joyful, human, freeing alternative to an exhausted, ugly, narrow vision of how human beings should behave.

It appears to me that the modern public face of social liberalism has ceased to seem positive, joyful, human, and freeing. I now mostly associate that public face with danger, with an endless list of things that you can’t do or say or think, and with the constant threat of being called an existentially bad person if you say the wrong thing, or if someone decides to misrepresent what you said as saying the wrong thing. There are so many ways to step on a landmine now, so many terms that have become forbidden, so many attitudes that will get you cast out if you even appear to hold them.

I’m far from alone in feeling that it’s typically not worth it to engage, given the risks. Dealing with younger people teaches me about the way these movements are perceived. I can’t tell you how common it is for me to talk to college-aged individuals, who seem like good people, who discuss liberal and left-wing beliefs as positive ideas, but who shrink from identifying with liberalism and feminism instinctively. I lament that fact, but it doesn’t surprise me. Of course, much of these feelings stem from conservative misrepresentations and slanders of what social liberalism is and means. But it also comes from the perception that, in the online forums where so much political discussion happens these days, the slightest misstep will result in character assassination and vicious condemnation.

Suppose you are a young college student inclined towards liberal or left-wing ideas. And further suppose that, like a lot of such college students, you enjoy Stephen Colbert and find him a political inspiration. Now imagine that, during the #CancelColbert fiasco, you defended Colbert on Twitter. If your defense was noticed by the people who police that forum, the consequences were likely to be brutal. People would not have said “here, let me talk you through this.” It wouldn’t have been a matter of friendly and inviting disagreement. Instead, as anyone paying attention saw, it would have been an invitation for immediate and unequivocal assault. That’s how the loudest voices on Twitter and Tumblr and Facebook act. The culture is one of attack, rather than of education. And the claims, typically, are existential: not “this thing you said is problematic from the standpoint of race,” but rather “you’re a racist.” Not “I think there’s some gender issues going here that you should think about,” but “you’re a misogynist.” Always. I know that there are kinder voices out there in socially liberal circles on social media, but unfortunately, when these social-media hurricanes get going, those voices are constantly and consistently drowned out… or driven out.

If you are a young person whose personality is still malleable and are subject to having your mind changed, and you decide to engage with socially liberal politics online, what are you going to learn immediately? Everything that you like is problematic. Every musician you like is misogynist. Every movie you like is secretly racist. Every cherished public figure has some deeply disqualifying characteristics. All of your victories are the product of privilege. Everyone you know and love who does not yet speak with the specialized vocabulary of today’s social justice movement is a bad, bad person. That is no way to build a broader coalition, which we desperately need if we are going to win. In the drive to correct everything and everyone with maximum energy and vigor, the zealots have reclaimed that aura of negativity and narrowness that was explicitly rejected by their ideological forefathers. It crushes joy, drains away positivity, and shackles thoughts in approved-language chains. The conservatives have blind adherence to their codes of thought and belief; we’re supposed to be better than that Skinner-box-trained crowd.

On matters of substance, I agree with almost everything that the social liberals on Tumblr and Twitter and blogs and websites believe. I believe that racism is embedded in many of our institutions. I believe that sexual violence is common and that we have a culture of misogyny. I believe that privilege is real. I believe all of that. And I understand and respect the need to express rage, which is a legitimate political emotion. But I also believe that there’s no possible way to fix these problems without bringing more people into the coalition. I would like to see the people who are committed to arguing about social justice online to work on building a culture that is unrelenting in its criticisms of injustice, but that leaves more room for education.

People have to be free to make mistakes, even ones that we find offensive, without being blown out of the water for it. If we turn away from or push away everyone that says or believes something dumb, we will find ourselves lecturing to an empty room. Surely there are ways to preserve righteous anger while being more circumspect about who is targeted by that anger. And I strongly believe that we can, and must, remind the world that social justice is about being happy, being equal, and being free.

Jason Francis

Jason Francis is a red-state liberal, residing in the heart of Dixie where he gets to watch the train wreck of conservative politics up close and personal on a regular basis. He's lived in affluence and poverty, in both urban and rural settings, attended both public and private schools, and has visited most of the US at one point or another.


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