A Message to Progressives Who Claim They Might Not Support the Democratic Nominee This November

While I’ve spent almost all of my career covering politics battling Republicans, there’s one group of people I can’t stand even more than my conservative counterparts: Supposed progressives who claim they’re not going to support the Democratic nominee this election if they don’t get their way.



These are the Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders supporters who claim to be “progressives,” but have said that they refuse to support the nominee if the person they currently support doesn’t ultimately win.

In my opinion, these people are just as bad, if not worse, than Republicans. In fact, I refer to this group of people as “absentee Republicans.” Because when you don’t vote for Democrats, especially for president, you might as well be voting for the Republican candidate. You are giving the GOP exactly what it wants.

There is entirely too much on the line this election for some voters to act like spoiled children who didn’t get their way. You want to change the Democratic party for the better? Great – we all do! But what we have to do before anything else is save this country from Republicans. It doesn’t do us any good to try to “improve the ideological nature of our party” when we’re allowing Republicans in every corner of this country to corrupt our voting process, attempt to rig our elections, gerrymander districts and make it nearly impossible for Democrats to win power in our government.

While these folks go out to make “symbolic votes” – Republicans are winning elections

In 2000, many “progressives” cast “symbolic votes” for Ralph Nader because they didn’t care for Al Gore – which handed George W. Bush the White House. Now seven years after his disastrous two-term presidency finally ended, we’re still trying to clean up his mess. And what did all those “symbolic votes” accomplish? Not a damn thing. All they did was allow Bush to take us into two wars, nearly double our national debt and wreck our economy. But I’m sure all those people who “voted symbolically” based upon their own selfish feelings above anything else felt really good about themselves that election. They sure “showed” all of us, didn’t they?

Would Al Gore have been a great president? Who knows. But I do know this much, he would have been a hell of a lot better than Bush.

And ultimately, that’s what these “purist” and “symbolical” voters are – selfish. All they care about is what they find important. They don’t care about others… they care about themselves. Sure, they claim to care about others. But their entire decision to help Republicans win is based solely on their own selfishness, ego and pride.

I’ve said this before, voting Democrat doesn’t benefit me personally nearly as much as it does many others. I’m a straight, white Christian male. My rights really aren’t on the line this election. But I fight practically every day to make damn sure Republicans don’t take back the White House.

I’ve spent years actively fighting for women, homosexuals, atheists, Muslims, health care for the poor, minorities, immigrants and practically everyone whose lives would be negatively impacted under GOP leadership. It would crush my soul to see all of that progress undone thanks to one election.

But those claiming that they might not support the Democratic candidate this November – they’re only thinking of themselves. What they want – what they believe.



So this is what I say to these people. If you don’t plan to “vote blue, no matter who” this November because your candidate didn’t win and you didn’t get your way, before you cast your “symbolic vote,” I would encourage you to:

  • Find a Mexican family (or any immigrant family for that matter) that has lived here for years and has been praying for immigration reform to get passed so they can become American citizens. Tell them that it doesn’t really bother you that they’ll likely be deported if a Republican becomes president.
  • Find someone who’s living in poverty, who obtained health care thanks to the Affordable Care Act. Tell them you don’t care that a Republican president will take their health care away from them.
  • Find a Muslim and tell them you’re okay with a Republican president spending the next four to eight years vilifying their religion, potentially setting up registries where they would be tracked like criminals.
  • Tell every woman you meet that you’re okay with a Republican president potentially appointing 3-4 Supreme Court Justices who will almost certainly deem abortions illegal, thus taking away her right to have control over her own body and putting millions of women’s lives at risk as they seek out desperate measures to end unwanted pregnancies.
  • Find a homosexual couple and let them know that you’re not concerned with a Republican president potentially appointing 3-4 Supreme Court Justices that will almost certainly deem bans on same-sex marriage legal and strip away gay rights any chance they get.
  • Find non-Christians and atheists and let them know that it doesn’t bother you that a Republican president will undoubtedly try to force Christianity on Americans, thus violating their First Amendment rights. Rights that will also be under attack if that same president stacks the Supreme Court with 3-4 ultra conservative Justices.
  • Find someone with a pre-existing condition. Tell them that you don’t have a problem going back to the “old system” of health care where individuals born with pre-existing conditions could be denied coverage and discriminated against by the health insurance industry, because a Republican president will damn sure repeal the Affordable Care Act.
  • Find climate scientists and everyone you can who cares about combating climate change. Tell them that it doesn’t really bother you that a Republican president would undo all the progress we’ve made to try to save our planet.

Please do all of that before you vote. Because when you don’t support either Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders, everything I just listed is exactly what you’re saying.

I don’t care what you think about either candidate personally, because both have flaws. But I damn sure know this much, both Clinton and Sanders will:

  • Protect women’s rights.
  • Stand for gay rights.
  • Push for more policies to combat climate change.
  • Support immigration reform.
  • Protect our current health care law and try to make it better.
  • Support real religious freedom – which also means freedom from religion. 
  • Fight for a higher minimum wage.

These are things no Republican candidate would do if elected. And with everything that’s on the line this election, our number one goal needs to be keeping the White House this November. Then after we secure the presidency, hold either Clinton’s or Sanders’ feet to the fire to make sure they keep most of their campaign promises.

This election isn’t about ushering in new ideas as much as it is about protecting the progress we’ve already made and building upon it going forward. Often, “winning a war” is about knowing how to pick your battles. This election, the battle we need to fight is for the defense of the White House. This election is as much about pushing new ideas as it is about keeping Republicans from destroying our old ones.

Pride, arrogance and selfishness by too many handed George W. Bush the White House in 2000. Now, 16 years later, we’re facing a similar situation. And if we don’t learn from history, we are doomed to repeat it.

Only this time, a President Trump, President Cruz or President Rubio will be an even bigger disaster than George W. Bush.

Hit me up on Twitter or Facebook and let me know what you think.




Allen Clifton

Allen Clifton is a native Texan who now lives in the Austin area. He has a degree in Political Science from Sam Houston State University. Allen is a co-founder of Forward Progressives and creator of the popular Right Off A Cliff column and Facebook page. Be sure to follow Allen on Twitter and Facebook, and subscribe to his channel on YouTube as well.

Comments

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  • Donna A Berg

    If the super delegates are what decide that Hillary wins the nomination then I see a very large number of democrats sitting out the election. If she wins the popular vote then I think most would be shift the allegiance. No one is going to support a candidate who has stacked the deck.

    • QB59

      Super delegates are who helped decide that Barack Obama was the nominee in 2008. So you’re saying you didn’t vote for him either?

      • Bobs_Vendetta

        Not true. Another Clintonista nursing an 8-year resentment.

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      • QB59

        I never supported Clinton in 2008. I voted for Obama twice. So I never had an 8 year “resentment”. Assumptions aren’t your strong suit.

    • Janis Garvey Hewes

      She is a crook and a liar and is not qualified to WIN anything without cheating..

  • Greg Doucette

    Trump will win no matter who I vote for if Hilliar is the nominee.

    • The Cosmic Avenger

      If you say that loudly enough and often enough, you might just make your wish come true!

      You can tell me you don’t want Trump, but by saying “Bernie or bust”, that’s what you’re doing. You’re wishing for Trump if YOUR candidate loses the primary.

      • NOT TRUE — If the person does not win, it is because there was not enough votes (electoral college or otherwise), so Trump must have people voting for him if he were to become POTUS. You, as a Democrat, must convince people like me to vote for your candidate, if you wish for your candidate to win. A lot of us are asking you to give us a candidate we can endorse. If the Democrats can’t do that — and your candidate loses, then the failure is squarely on YOU!

      • The Cosmic Avenger

        I do not determine who the Democratic candidate for president will be this year. I determine who *I* vote for. You determine who you vote for. It’s not my job to convince you of anything. What Allen and I and a bunch of other people are telling you that, if you can’t deign to vote for the lesser of two evils, you may well bring the greater of them down on all of us. So saying “Hilary doesn’t deserve it” doesn’t cut it; if it’s a choice between her and Trump, and you don’t vote, you’re choosing Trump…unless you live in a very solidly Democratic state. (See my comment below)

      • WareWolf

        Try as you might, you will not convince me I must either drink from the douche or eat the turd sandwich when I can plainly see filet mignon and pinot noir on the menu.

      • The Cosmic Avenger

        OK, to use your analogy, what if the menu ONLY has the douchetini and the scat sandwich, and if you don’t pick, one will be force-fed to you anyway? Because that’s what might happen. Are you not getting it? You can say you’re conscientiously abstaining from the election because they’re equally bad, but then you don’t get to complain about President Trump appointing himself to the Supreme Court while still in office.

      • WeAreNotAmused

        Again, are you deaf or just stupid? No one said they are conscientiously abstaining from voting. We’re writing in the candidate of our choice, which is our right and duty.

      • I sense some relief there when you said, “It is not my job to convince you of anything.” Defending Clinton can’t be the easiest job in the world to do. Especially with her ties to the folks that are very likely responsible for the economic crash. Goldman Sach’s and the rest of those Wall Street bankers and execs. But, if no one can convince me that Clinton does not have ties to them, then one cannot convince me that she is a better choice than Trump, Cruz, Rubio, Kasich or Carson. In fact, I look at that list — it is easier to convince me that some of those (like maybe Carson because of his lack of ties with Wall Street) may be a better candidate than Clinton could ever dream to be. The very fact that she is reluctant to hand over the speeches of 2013 and that she is a heavy critic of Wall Street now tells me she has something to hide. Good luck with Clinton. It is going to be a hard road indeed.

      • Janis Garvey Hewes

        and do not forget Benghazi The guys she murdered there ..o how easy you forget Brainwashed Hilbot..she cares nothing about you or anyone else..She is a Sociopath..she set her own daughter up to make a fool of herself

      • “o how easy you forget Brainwashed Hilbot”

        If you have been reading my post(s) ^^ above, then you would not have called me a “Brainwashed Hilbot.” NO! I haven’t forgotten Benghazi.

      • Sven2S47

        A-hole fggot.

      • WeAreNotAmused

        Wake the F up; we are writing in Bernie, not skipping the vote. That is what our consciences dictate. If something doesn’t give soon, we’ll see a class war. Shillary and her cronies scare me more than the rather bumbling Trump.

  • WriterDoc

    Interesting that people are complaining about superdelegate votes for Hillary Clinton this year but no-one seemed to complain that the same process caused Hillary to lose to President Obama in their 2008 primary race.

    Due to a close race the contest remained competitive for longer than expected, and neither candidate received enough delegates from state primary races and caucuses to achieve a majority without superdelegate votes. The race was further complicated by a controversy over the scheduling of the Michigan and Florida state primaries, which had been scheduled earlier than party rules permitted, affecting the number of delegates those states sent to the national convention.

    If Michigan and Florida had been counted, Clinton would have had the popular vote lead because she had more actual votes from the state contests. But Obama received enough superdelegate endorsements on June 3 to claim he had secured the majority needed to win the nomination, and Clinton conceded four days later.

    As a good Democrat, Clinton recognized then that she needed to follow DNC rules and practices, which remain in force during 2016. Why should anyone now expect her to eliminate superdelegate influence when she followed DNC practices in securing a large majority of them to support her nomination? Senator Sanders has had the same opportunity to secure superdelegates on his side of the ledger, but he hasn’t done so because party heavyweights don’t consider him the better candidate. So be it. Same rules for all–no changes.

    • Bobs_Vendetta

      Where’s all this b.s. about Obama winning because of superdelegates coming from? I broke with Obama in 2009, but he won thanks to the voters, not the superdelegates. This seems like an effort to justify, in advance, over-ruling the voters this year if that becomes necessary. Just the sort of propaganda the Clinton political machine would devise.

      • karensc

        So, you’re really a Republican in disguise. Big shock.

      • WareWolf

        He said he “broke with Obama,” not that he was a Republican.

        I know it’s hard for a lot of people to do, but try allowing your little mind to examine the possibility that not everything is binary.

      • Bobs_Vendetta

        And you’re a stooge for Wall Street and the oligarchs. Big shock.

      • Paul Val

        exactly

      • WriterDoc

        You’re wrong. Just go look at the public record and stop asserting falsehoods. Simple delegate vote count showed both short of the nomination in 2008. Superdelegates shifted to Obama and gave him the nomination, just as the system allowed them to do. It’s math, Bobs, not opinion.

      • Bobs_Vendetta

        As I recall, he secured the final delegates he needed in the final primaries in June and gave what amounted to a victory speech. At any rate, he definitely had more delegates than Clinton. Superdelegates did not over-rule the voters and hand him the nomination. And that is my point.

      • WriterDoc

        Bobs– If your point is that Obama had more elected delegates than Clinton on June 3, you’re right. As of June 3 he led Clinton by 69 pledged delegates or, if including projected delegates from non-binding contests, by 124. But even the latter number left him 354 superdelegates short of the 2,118 needed for victory. It was a dicey campaign because of the DNC’s decision to ban Michigan’s and Florida’s delegates entirely for having January primaries in violation of DNC rules. Had they been included, Clinton likely would still have been behind but by a much closer margin. She received 55% of both the Michigan and Florida vote.

        All this said, my point was that Obama had to have 354 superdelegates go his way to secure the number of total delegates needed for his nomination. And no-one knows now what the superdelegates will do–or who will be ahead in elected delegates–when this cycle ends. So all the hoopla about superdelegates is of no consequence at this point. No rules need changing, and Sanders has just as much chance to compete for superdelegates as Clinton does. Let the band play on..

      • James120756 .

        Exactly. THIS in a nutshell is what is going to throw this election to the GOP.

  • Please understand — I CAN’T support Hillary Clinton because I DON’T support war, Wall Street bonus bailouts, the NSA, the TSA, the drug war, asset forfeiture, for-profit prisons, drone bombings, domestic spying, militarized police and torture. I WON’T support those policies regardless of how they are packaged and/or marketed to me.

    • QB59

      Wait until you get a load of the package of policies you’ll get with a republican in the WH.

      • Bobs_Vendetta

        Won’t be all that different. Hasn’t been for the past 36 years.

      • pamelina

        If you believe that, will you vote for Bernie? Because most of his supporters think there will be a big difference, and they’ll turn out to vote for him.

      • Bobs_Vendetta

        Already have. Bernie WILL be different. Hillary won’t be. She is the epitome of business as usual. If the Dems nominate her, she will lose to Donald, who — despite the obvious negatives — would also be a break from business as usual.

      • Republican or Clinton. When put that way, we all will be stuck with that “load of the package of policies.”

      • Paul Val

        republican, democrat, same players different club, voting for hllary is the same as voting for trump, that is why neither will get my vote, I WILL NOT BE BULLIED INTO VOTING for the ESTABLISHMENT. Bernie gets my vote, nomination or not, and the chips will fall where they belong, and if trump gets elected, you can blame the clintonites and the DNC for failing the PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • QB59

        Not voting because your ideal candidate isn’t on the ballot come November is handing the election to Trump or whomever is the GOPer candidate.

      • Janis Garvey Hewes

        The gop Candidate is Hillary What planet are you on?
        HilBot Land I suspect ..#BernieSanders2016
        Bernie and NO OTHERS.

      • pamelina

        Excuse me, but isn’t it YOU who’re handing the election to Trump by supporting Hillary when you could support Bernie without compromising your principles?

      • QB59

        I haven’t voted in any primary as of yet. And what this article is about is supporting whomever is the Dem candidate in the general election, which I agree with. I sure as hell won’t be voting for the republican, and third party candidates are a wasted vote. There is no guarantee at this point that Bernie Sanders will be the nominee, but his ardent supporters act like petulant children who will stay home and not vote if he isn’t the Dem nominee. That’s beyond stupid.

      • OliviaCatSunflower

        Yeah no it’s really not the same. Although the approximately twenty exclamation marks tell me there is little chance of drilling that through your skull.

      • pamelina

        You heard her. She’s being honest, and I’ve heard many people say the same thing.

        You have two choices: continue to vote for Hillary and risk losing the election to Trump.

        Switch your vote to Bernie in the primary, and watch Democrats sweep Trump in the general election, with a congress to help.

      • OliviaCatSunflower

        I did vote for Bernie, asshole.

  • Lilytiger

    The DNC decided to push Hillary as the Nominee before she even ran. They squashed any other candidate and now are upset that we can see it for what it is. You backed the wrong horse and we are not going to fall in line. We will use our votes, not YOU.

    • Blinknone

      Hillary is gonna wipe the floor with Panders.

  • The Cosmic Avenger

    Look people, I voted for Nader in 2000 because Gore became even more centrist and corporate than Clinton has. And he had farther to fall, IMO. But I live in a solidly blue state that I KNEW would go to Gore no matter what. If I had lived in Florida, you can bet I would have held my nose and voted for Gore, and urged everyone I knew to do the same.

    You want Clinton to get the message that you think she’s too moderate, too much of an insider? Trust me, her campaign hears all of this fuss on social media. But they also know that even if she became a progressive dream candidate, none of the Cult of Bernie followers would vote for her, you’d all make fun of her for flip-flopping. And actually, of the two remaining Democratic candidates, she’s got the better chance in the general election because she’s more moderate. So I’ll probably still vote for Sanders in the primary, and then whoever the Democratic candidate is in the fall, but to be honest I’ve started to hate the Sanders movement for its absolutism.

    • karensc

      I live in a solidly red state. I am still voting for the Democratic candidate, no matter who that is. My vote really doesn’t count, but I don’t care. I’m voting blue.

    • Paul Val

      people are fed up, that’s why some are so passionate about sanders, don’t let them sway your vote

    • WareWolf

      No, I want to send Clinton a repeat of the message we sent her in 2008: “Go the fuck away, you self-serving liar.”

      • tracey marie

        buh bye equality…have your snit fit and be sure to not whine with a gop president

      • WeAreNotAmused

        You’re the one who is kidding yourself. The Clintons never supported marriage equality. No less, too much is at stake to worry about one issue. I don’t believe in marriage for anyone, so that is not a swing issue. I’m far more concerned with family planning, SS, Medicare and the dangers of the oligarchy/military-industrial complex.

    • Bobs_Vendetta

      Please read my post above. She does not have the better chance. Hillary is unelectable.

    • Janis Garvey Hewes

      Do not call Bernie Supporters a Cult..Why don’t you tell your Friend Hillary to give up the transcripts..Why don’t you do something positive instead of calling Our Candidate a Old Cult leader..You get paid to lie..just ;like Hillary..Cosmic Avenger Ha ! Troll Slime Bag..

    • WeAreNotAmused

      People supporting Sanders are not a cult, but rather people who realize we’re at a tipping point. If we don’t dismantle the Billionaire Boys Club in both parties, then we are doomed as a nation and as a planet. Neither the clown car Rethuglicans nor Shillary will change the 1%-oligarchy status quo, and that situation is unsustainable. There comes a times when people have to draw a line in the sand. It’s not absolutism, but realism.

  • cruisersailor

    Voting in every single election is important. We don’t want the GOP to win, do we?

    • WareWolf

      I don’t want either of the parties to win.

      If it isn’t plainly apparent to you that our politicians from *both* parties are all a bunch of self-serving whores, then you’re either new to the USA or you haven’t been paying attention.

      • tracey marie

        say goodbye to marriage equality, dems tend to have purity tests and snit fits then whine about government

      • OliviaCatSunflower

        Yeah, well, SPOILER ALERT: one of the parties is going to win. Sorry.

    • Blinknone

      I do. 😉

    • James120756 .

      Do we? Maybe we should just put the candidates under those three card monte cups. It’s getting really difficult to tell them apart anymore. Sanders and Trump are the only obvious standouts. Bernie because he’s the only one who’s real and Trump because he’s completely batshit crazy.

    • WeAreNotAmused

      Who said people aren’t going to vote? Many of us plan to write in Bernie, if the DNC/HRC bots manipulate the nomination.

  • strayaway

    There is another option here that this article and everyone seems to be missing. As it stands now, the deck is stacked against Sanders. He has to win almost 20% more delegates in every primary from now on to beat Hillary because of her super delegate handicap advantage. As soon as Bernie’s supporters realize that, they will stay home in the primary and Hillary can be crowned.

    Bernie keeps talking the talk about “revolution” but his supporters show little fire for waging any sort of revolution in the primary. They are being primed with articles like this to accept Bernie’s almost certain primary defeat. If they really cared about Bernie’s revolution, they would be storming the DNC headquarters to reform super delegate rules and would have to be dragged away by police. Like good little sheep, they instead accept the establishment’s rules. That’s why, in the end, they will enthusiastically support a sociopathic, warmongering, corporatist Democrat instead of a sociopathic, warmongering, corporatist Republican. Baaaa.

    • WareWolf

      Wrong. Hillary has no superdelegate advantage.

      Those unpledged delegates don’t matter until the nominating convention. They account for roughly 15% of the total, and they have NEVER swung against the popular vote.

      They *thought* about it in 2008, but they were the ones who realized that if they kept licking the establishment boots instead of listening to the popular will, they’d lose the white house; they intelligently threw their support behind Obama.

      You’re trying to argue that it’s the tail that wags the dog, when in reality **we** control their direction.

      • strayaway

        “Those unpledged delegates don’t matter until the nominating convention.” That’s the point. Not all super delegates have pledged themselves at this point. There are a total of 712 super delegates of whom 492 have pledged their vote to Hillary already and 19 to Sanders. 2,382 delegates are needed to win that nomination. Including the already mentioned pledged super delegates and regular pledged delegates won in primaries, Bernie presently has about 70 pledged delegates and Hillary has about 700. Somehow, Bernie has to make up his 630 delegate deficit with only 1,600 hundred, or so, delegates still in the running. That’s about impossible. By Super Tuesday, this contest should be effectively over. That is why it is helpful to read articles like this to accept that supporting a sociopathic, warmongering, corporatist Democrat instead of a sociopathic, warmongering, corporatist Republican is desirable. Resistance is futile. Bernie supporters aren’t capable of resistance anyway. They should practice baaing.

      • Bobs_Vendetta

        Even those superdelegates who have pledged themselves can change their minds at any time. The Democratic Party has never (yet) over-ruled the voters with superdelegates. If that happens this year, there will be a grass roots rebellion in the party. The convention (in Philly, ironically) will be like 1968. If the voters decision is nullified, Independents en masse will turn away from the Democratic Party.

      • strayaway

        Regular delegates can change their vote too. I know of one who did and was consequently kicked out of the Republican Party. To base any hope on people who have pledged their vote switching sides seems like grasping at straws.

    • tracey marie

      The article was not slamming Bernie, that is your issue. The article stated facts why no matter what voting Dem is important

      • strayaway

        Where did the article or I slam Bernie? I called his opponent “a sociopathic, warmongering, corporatist Democrat”, not Bernie.

      • tracey marie

        and I said you are a moronic whininy baby looking for something that was not stated or implied.

      • strayaway

        You lose.

      • tracey marie

        lol, go back to bed.

  • WareWolf

    I will vote for the candidate who most closely represents and espouses my views on the issues.

    • tracey marie

      the gop thanks you.say goodbye to marriage equality.

      • It was the Clinton administration that signed into law the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) of 1996. Democrat or Republican — it is a flip of the coin these days….

      • tracey marie

        Hillary has been President, who knew.

      • Hillary has been President, who knew.

        ???
        I never said that Hillary was president. I was simply responding to your reply that the GOP will end marriage equality. It was Bill Clinton that signed into law the Defense of Marriage Act. By the way, he was not GOP. So, just because one is a Democrat does not mean that one is for marriage equality. Likewise, I could mention a few Republicans who support marriage equality. Go figure…

      • WeAreNotAmused

        You really are a one-note blithering idiot. Do some research, you fool. HRC stated in an interview she did not believe in same-sex marriage. Stop buying her hype.

    • Bernie Sanders and Jill Stein speak for me as well. Thank you! I can vote for a Libertarian, so Gary Johnson is in my radar as well….

  • Little Wing

    Hillary is not an improvement. Hillary is not going to give my kids their government back. She is getting rich letting the wealthy and powerful determine the policies my kids live under. My kids are 18 and 24 and prepared to make sacrifices for this fight. What we are not prepared for are the sacrifices of the bodies of war that Hillary is so detached from. Not American bodies, not civilian bodies in the middle east…. not the 22 American Veterans that commit suicide every day. This fight is too important to cowardly bow out of it in favor of a safe but oppressed measure of comfort.

    What favor do you see it to your children to keep them in an economy where working people can’t even afford a car, home, etc. Where people no longer take those family vacations and most people would be ruined if they miss a single paycheck? That is the world of unregulated banking and the Military Industrial Complex. That is Hillary’s world.

    I’m not putting another forked tongue piece of sh*t in the White House with my vote. I’m voting for the only decent man standing.

    • tracey marie

      and if he loses the nomination, will you vote or have a snit fit?

      • Janis Garvey Hewes

        I will find you and “snit” right in your troll face idiot.

      • tracey marie

        temper temper…go take a nap

      • WeAreNotAmused

        You need to stick your stubborn head in a pile of your dog’s feces. Maybe that would wake you out of your stupor. If you removed your head from your posterior, then you would know many Bernie supporters have pledged to write him in; that is not the same as not voting.

      • Little Wing

        He’s not going to lose. He is doing better than Obama was against her in 2008. Relax.

      • tracey marie

        uh huh

  • Little Wing
  • Bobs_Vendetta

    By the way, Hillary supporters, there is a flaw in your argument. Hillary Clinton is unelectable. I know, I know, the agreed-upon conventional wisdom is that Bernie is unelectable. But consider the facts:
    40% of the electorate is Independent, outnumbering Democrats (30%) and Republicans (30%). Among Independents, distrust of Hillary is deep and wide. They won’t vote for her in significant numbers, and whoever wins in November will get 40% of their votes from Independents. Bernie has consistently out-polled Hillary among Independent voters. What we have seen in the voting so far confirms it. Bernie is attracting much more support from Independents.
    Secondly, there have now been several polls pitting Bernie and Hillary against various Republicans. In every single one of them, Bernie defeats just about every Republican. In every single one of them, Hillary loses to nearly every Republican.
    Hillary is unelectable.

    • tracey marie

      so will you vote for her if she wins or not?

      • Bobs_Vendetta

        I oppose rule by plutocracy. I oppose neoliberal economics. I oppose government for sale to the highest bidder.
        I support government of the people, by the people, for the people.

        Please name a candidate besides Bernie Sanders, in either party, who holds to that agenda. Except for Bernie, I haven’t found that candidate.

      • tracey marie

        so no, you will have a snit fit instead.

  • tracey marie

    Damn, all you bernie types have once again jumped on your purity/snit fit wagon. This article was about voting for the nominated Dem, not a slam on Bernie.

  • Blinknone

    Millions of GOP voters sat out in 2012 rather than vote for Romney. It’s likely why Obama was reelected. I was one of the voters who sat out (actually voted 3rd party). I don’t regret it for a second.

    • OliviaCatSunflower

      No one else regrets that you did either lol

  • Concerned Citizen….

    The very last thing this country needs is Hillary Clinton in the White House.

  • Rocinante

    I will never ever vote for a Clinton. If the Democrats want my vote, nominate Sanders or its going to a 3rd party. I’ve had it with the Clinton legacy of selling out Policy to acquire Power. You want Progressive? Go tell it to the millions of Black youth the Clintons shoveled into Americas prison system so they could make a buck. F*** them. They destroyed the Democratic Party and its progressive traditions so they could regain the WHITE vote in the south and midwest. That is it.

  • Darkbeerandcheese

    It’s Bernie in the primary for me. Hillary’s only positive point is that she isn’t a Republican in 2016, even though she’s basically a Republican from ~1990.

    In the general, since I live in a state that will go Red no matter what I do, I feel as though I’m free to vote my conscience, and that will be Bernie if possible or Jill Stein otherwise. Nothing could make me vote for a Libertarian candidate. If I lived in a swing state, I might hold my nose, do my ‘duty,’ and vote Hillary as the lesser of the evils, which is a very sad and uninspired thing to do.

  • steelcityguy

    Clinton and her husband have played a pivotal role in destroying the middle class, eviscerating upward mobility, abetting mass incarceration etc.. Their sole modus operandi is to deliver the left to the same ruling elite to which the Republicans deliver the right.

    People such as yourself, among the few in the shrinking pool of the well off and somewhat well off, might be satisfied with the red herring “progress” on social justice issues etc., but to the working people who struggle to make a living while raising families, the Clinton complicity is the policies that are the cause of their travails is of paramount concern. They don’t care about her “promises”. She LIES to line her own pocket. Her and her husband’s record speaks for itself.

    So, NO, we will not vote for Hillary. Voting for Drumpf might mean death, but a vote for Hillary is just a stay of execution.

  • Salvador Bucci

    So we should support a pro corporate war hawk. Hmmm. Not very appealing. She is a typical machine politician. I am Bushed out. I am Clintoned out. I do not triangulate when I vote. If I like someone I vote for them.