One Comment from Rick Santorum Perfectly Sums Up the Republican Ignorance on Green Energy (Video)

When it comes to the overwhelming ignorance on climate change emanating from most Republicans, it really comes down to three main factors:

  • Being poorly educated.
  • Religious radicals.
  • People who’ve been brainwashed and manipulated by a political party that’s been bought and paid for by big oil.

Sure, there are other smaller factors at play here, but when you get right down to it, those are the main three culprits.



Naturally, when you get a group of people who support a stance on an issue that isn’t based on facts, reality, science, or even basic common sense, you’re going to get a lot of incredibly absurd answers when they’re forced to defend their stupidity.

For example, Thursday when former GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum, someone with a well-documented history when it comes to not understanding the basic facts about climate change, tried defending Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement — a climate pact that nearly every other nation on Earth has agreed to.

During a debate on CNN, Governor Jennifer Granholm (D-MI) factually pointed out that green energy initiatives are creating millions of jobs, including 90,000 currently in her state.  That’s when things went off the rails.

“There are 3.3 million people in America that are working in the clean energy industry,” Granholm stated. “If you look at my state, there are almost 90,000 jobs in clean energy right now.”

“We have a fracking revolution,” Santorum replied. “And it’s driving down the cost of our electricity.”

“Solar and wind are cheaper than coal,” she shot back. “Right now, China is cancelling 107 of its coal plants because, why? Solar and wind are cheaper than coal. Same in India.”

“It’s not reliable, it’s not consistent,” Santorum opined.

“Oh my god!” Granholm said in disbelief.

Yes, ladies and gentleman, you read that correctly, Santorum literally said that the sun and wind aren’t reliable, consistent sources of energy.

This is the possibly the most idiotic part of the entire argument made by conservatives like Santorum. That somehow because the sun goes away at night, or there could be a few cloudy days, or it’s not always windy, that means green energy isn’t “reliable and consistent.”

For the sake of argument, let’s say Republicans have a point and that wind, solar, and let’s throw in water energy for good measure, aren’t as reliable (cloudy days, less wind, droughts) as fossil fuels. Why does that even matter? Even if green forms of energy can only produce 50, 60, or 70 percent of what’s needed by human beings — that’s a massive reduction in the amount of fossil fuels we’re currently using and burning into our atmosphere.



This is the same type of small-mindedness you see when the gun violence debate comes up. Since stricter gun laws won’t eliminate 100 percent of all gun violence, to many Republicans, that means they don’t work at all. Somehow in their delusional world, even a 20 or 30 percent reduction in something negative isn’t worth the effort.

In my opinion, this one comment from Santorum about sun and wind energy not being “reliable and consistent” is the perfect representation of how ridiculous Republicans are when it comes to green energy and climate change. That one of his best arguments against energy from the sun and the wind is that two natural resources that have literally been around for billions of years aren’t “reliable or consistent.”

The worst part of all of this is, the ignorance from conservatives on these issues can’t simply be ignored. Their mind-boggling stupidity about climate change and reducing human reliance on the fossil fuels that are literally destroying our planet could very well end life for the human race.

Watch Santorum’s comments below via CNN by way of Raw Story:





Allen Clifton

Allen Clifton is a native Texan who now lives in the Austin area. He has a degree in Political Science from Sam Houston State University. Allen is a co-founder of Forward Progressives and creator of the popular Right Off A Cliff column and Facebook page. Be sure to follow Allen on Twitter and Facebook, and subscribe to his channel on YouTube as well.

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