Here are the Two Biggest Things That Stood Out From Ted Cruz’s Shocking Convention Speech

When I first heard that Texas Senator Ted Cruz had accepted a slot to speak at the GOP presidential convention, I slammed him for being a coward who sold out to bow down and “kiss the ring” of someone who he clearly cannot stand. Someone who had mocked his wife’s looks, raised questions about his citizenship and tried to link his father to JFK’s assassination.



I was somewhat wrong about the whole thing.

Admittedly, I let my disdain for Cruz blind me from remembering the type of person he is. I should have expected what ultimately happened on Wednesday night in Cleveland when Cruz gave his speech. All it turned out to be was free national publicity to help him set up his eventual 2020 presidential run while also “sticking it” to Trump.

On one hand, while I loathe the guy, I’ll at least give him credit for not going “Chris Christie,” casting aside all pride and self-dignity to cower at the feet of Donald Trump. While it pains me to say it, Cruz standing on that stage Wednesday night, essentially giving Trump the proverbial “middle finger” during the GOP’s convention was enjoyable to watch. Obviously his goal when he accepted the invitation to speak was to try to undermine and embarrass Trump, which is something I’m always in favor of seeing.

However, on the other hand, this was classic Ted Cruz.

By that I mean, this was Cruz using an opportunity to make something about him. Someone who’s used his entire career as a United States senator as one long, taxpayer-funded presidential campaign, used his own party’s convention as another public forum to set up his next bid for the White House, in 2020. Because make no mistake about it, as much as he was trying to “stick it” to Donald Trump on a national stage, this was also a lot about using that spotlight to start building the foundation for his next run at the presidency. If there’s one thing Cruz has proven time and time again, it’s that everything he does is all about what he thinks is best for him — and nothing else.

How this ultimately impacts Cruz is anybody’s guess.

Part of me thinks it might help him considering there’s a good chunk of the Republican party who are ashamed that Trump is their party’s candidate.



However, let’s not forget that Trump has very loyal supporters, many of whom aren’t going to forget this. Especially considering if Trump isn’t successful this November, I can guarantee you that he’s not going to sit by quietly during Cruz’s 2020 campaign. He will be everywhere, doing whatever he can to get voters to support just about any other candidate but Cruz.

Then there’s the issue of loyalty within his own party.

While I’m not sure many people trusted Cruz to begin with, who would trust him now? He already had a reputation within the GOP for being someone who often put himself ahead of the party, so this certainly isn’t going to help that reputation. And based on the initial reaction I’m seeing online, he might have just ended his career. Though it’s still way too early to tell if this will stick, or eventually blow over in the next few days.

Needless to say, no matter what anyone might think of what happened Wednesday night, one thing that was for certain is Ted Cruz showed exactly who he’s been his entire career. So I guess if there’s any “blame” to go around, it should be on anyone who trusted this lying sociopath to begin with.




Allen Clifton

Allen Clifton is a native Texan who now lives in the Austin area. He has a degree in Political Science from Sam Houston State University. Allen is a co-founder of Forward Progressives and creator of the popular Right Off A Cliff column and Facebook page. Be sure to follow Allen on Twitter and Facebook, and subscribe to his channel on YouTube as well.

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  • ORAXX

    It’s good that Cruz failed to endorse Trump, but if the alternative is his extreme brand of fundamentalist Christo-fascism, then don’t exactly see that as an improvement. Cruz is every bit the narcissist Trump is.