Why The Founding Fathers Would Have Despised Today’s “Tea Party”

teapartierEvery 4th of July, without fail, I’ll see a few nutjobs come out with their “America, love it or leave it” or “This is America, speak English” stickers and such. Despite the ridiculous irony that their stickers, t-shirts and flags are made in China or a Bangladeshi sweatshop, there’s something else they’re entirely unaware of. The fact is, the Founding Fathers would have hated the Tea Party – misspelled signs and all.

Yes, you heard that right, they would have despised the ammo-hoarding sycophants of AM talk radio for a number of reasons, and would have likely lined them up in front of a firing squad or fitted them for a noose if this was the 18th century.

First of all, the original Tea Party was a protest of being forced to pay taxes on imported goods for which there was no competition. The East India Trading Company had the cozy relationship with the British government that allowed them to have a monopoly on tea and other items. Imagine Walmart being the only store from which you could buy and they dictated both cost and taxes on everything. The real Tea Party wasn’t about mentally unstable rants about oppressive government and imagined Muslim takeovers, it was about actual oppressive government in which there was no representation for the colonists.

In the modern United States, we do have representation and theoretically, everyone can vote. The American Revolution used bullets because ballots weren’t available and the East India Tea Company had too much power in government. Now we have ballots and so-called “patriots” are trying to take away voting rights, talking about using bullets if they don’t get what they want, and supporting corporate power in government via Citizens United. You know, the opposite of what the Founding Fathers and the real Tea Party were all about.

Still don’t believe the Founding Fathers would have brought out the army against the Tea Party? Consider this. In the 1790’s, some settlers in the western portion of Pennsylvania didn’t want to pay taxes on whiskey they produced and destroyed the home of a tax official in protest. In response, George Washington sent out the state militia (you know, that “well-regulated militia” in the 2nd Amendment) to put down what is now known as The Whiskey Rebellion. This set the precedent for states enforcing the laws set by the Federal government, not the states making laws like Arizona has done in violation of Federal statutes and then complaining when the Supreme Court strikes them down. The main participants on the rebel side were arrested and tried for treason, not given celebrity status on Fox News.

So, to people like Ted Nugent and all the other “I’m gonna overthrow the government but I was too chickenshit to fight in Vietnam” people who like to wrap themselves in Chinese-made American flags, stop pretending the Founding Fathers would have liked you and supported your corporate-funded “grassroots” cause. They would have tarred and feathered you before running you out of town on a rail – if you were lucky.


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  • Jenny

    It wasn’t the East india TEA Company, it was just the East India Company. This company became extremely wealthy from slave trading. A lot of the history of the East India Company can be found in Robert Brenner’s book, Merchants and Revolutions.

    • hahaha!!!!!!!!! Yeah OK

      …and they would’ve loved the CORPORATE WHORES using TAX PAYERS MONIES TO FUND BIG BANKS – BIG SOLAR – BIG INFASTRRUCTURE – BIG PHARMA (OBAMACARE) that “””DEMOCRATS””” have become ..OK bruh

      • Martin

        The idea behind Obamacare is to relieve us of overwhelmingly high costs of CORPORATE Healthcare…Got your refund check yet? When you do let us know how good it was before…The only large mouths screaming Obamacare is wrong are big Corporations(Like the East India Co. types) and sheeple who don’t get the big picture and still buy their prescriptions over the net from Canada because “It’s Cheaper…” UH, Duh!

      • Roberta Privette

        Amazing. It’s big corporations who have lobbied and made campaign contributions to get this pile of bureaucratic ruination passed.

      • Dennis Frisby

        What’s that? Oh you mean Medicare Part D? or

      • Guest

        DUH what an idiot

      • xnerd

        So you live in a parallel universe that up is down and black is white, and the democrats are the party shoveling money to corporate interests…..

        What is it like there?

        Never mind you more then like don’t “get it”

      • Michael Keville

        Big Solar??? are you high.?How about big oil? Wall Street and Corporate welfare for the likes of Exxon, GE, BOA and countless others. It’ s our corrupt republican controlled Koch Brothers back , do nothing obstructionist congress.

      • Kerry Woods-Relf

        Sigh… stop watching Fox and Alex Jones, shot off your computer and go to a library.

      • Dennis Frisby

        Democrats didn’t fund BIG PHARMA that was bush and his part d bonanza, The ACA has nothing to do with drug companies and the money given to Solar pales compared to the billions given (by pugs) to oil, gas, coal.

      • Dennis Frisby

        INFRASTRUCTURE gets you to work and shop and every other aspect of you life da

  • It bears repeating: the tea that was thrown into Boston Harbor had no tax stamp on it. The original Tea Partiers were REFUSING untaxed tea.

    • Charles Vincent

      “It bears repeating: the tea that was thrown into Boston Harbor had no tax stamp on it. The original Tea Partiers were REFUSING untaxed tea.”
      This is patently false on your part.

      “On December 16, 1773, after officials in Boston refused to return three shiploads of taxed tea to Britain, a group of colonists boarded the ships and destroyed the tea by throwing it into Boston Harbor.”

      They pitched the taxed tea into the harbor because Massachusetts royal governor Thomas Hutchenson refused to send it back to England. Stop spreading fallacies.

    • William

      The tea was taxed. Parliament decided to bail out the East India Company by allowing tea bound for the Colonies to pass through England’s ports without paying that tax and also ship tea directly to the Colonies. It was still taxed in the Colonies, and the point of the Tea Act was to ensure that the Colonies were paying levied taxes rather than buying duty-free tea. In essence, England was still taxing the Colonies while also trying to force them to buy English tea by lowering the price to a point that would rival tea smuggled in from elsewhere.

      Parliament could have suspended local taxes in the Colonies to help push East India tea, but that would have seemed like the colonists were justified in complaining about taxes levied to recover from the French & Indian War. The “compromise” was to try to trick the colonists into paying their taxes by making English tea too cheap to ignore. The ploy and the fact that the Colonies had no say in the matter was a problem.

  • Charles Vincent

    “So, to people like Ted Nugent and all the other “I’m gonna overthrow the government but I was too chickenshit to fight in Vietnam” people who like to wrap themselves in Chinese-made American flags, stop pretending the Founding Fathers would have liked you and supported your corporate-funded “grassroots” cause. They would have tarred and feathered you before running you out of town on a rail – if you were lucky”

    This is highly unlikely. It’s much more plausible that they would storm washington and arrest the idiots running this country, and then hang Obama for treason and the murder of at least three us citizens with out them having been afforded due process.

    • Pat n

      And I guess they would have kissed G.W.’s ass.

      • Charles Vincent

        Probably not but way to stereotype.

    • Mikeinthedirt

      It is much more plausible they would not have permitted affairs to go this far. The founders and their peers were engaged and informed (they had BS too, but no Snopes or Wikipedia so made do with skepticism) and involved.
      The blame game was not considered governance.

      • Charles Vincent

        I concur. How ever given that I was commenting on this article and how they would most likely react to the things going on with the current administration. I also wasn’t playing the blame game as I don’t particularly like what either party has been doing.

    • chucks_a_moron

      Have you ever read anything other than your own posts? You’re probably the most uninformed person I’ve seen on the Internet … including AOL chat rooms.

      • Charles Vincent

        Yes I sort of have to read what people post. I actually do cursory research on topics before I comment and I use those findings in my posts. And if you want to talk about uninformed you should read your own post because it contains a blatant ad homonym attack instead of factual arguments that refute what I was asserting.

      • Jack

        ad hominem*

      • Charles Vincent

        Yes damn auto correct thanks for the catch

  • Guest

    1. The fact is, the Founding Fathers would have hated the Tea Party – misspelled signs and all… what a low blow.. do you really think that the founding fathers looked down on people who were as educated as them..

    2. you are nit picking the associations between what was done and why back in the old days with the current tea party.

    3. “Now we have ballots and so-called “patriots” are trying to take away
    voting rights, talking about using bullets if they don’t get what they
    want, and supporting corporate power in government via Citizens United” …do share with me how the patriots are trying to take away voting rights..the problem with both parties is that they are full of crap like your article which is well written however baseless claims are used to inflame the readers emotions..

    4. blah blah blah.. more of the same

  • dsdjkhjb

    1. “The fact is, the Founding Fathers would have hated the Tea Party – misspelled signs and all” what a low blow.. …do you really think that the founding fathers looked down on people who were not as educated as them…..you putting forth information regarding facts about people.. “the FACT is, the founding fathers…. as if you knew them personally… where did they write that.. see your article is full of crappy opinions… we all know about opinions…

    2. you are nit picking the associations between what was done and why back in the old days with the current tea party.

    3. “Now we have ballots and so-called “patriots” are trying to take away
    voting rights, talking about using bullets if they don’t get what they
    want,and supporting corporate power in government via Citizens United” …do share with me how the patriots are trying to take away voting
    rights..the problem with both parties is that they are full of crap like
    your article which is well written however baseless claims are used to
    inflame the readers emotions..

    4. blah blah blah.. more of the same

    • Jason

      The Founding Fathers DID disdain the common man; they didn’t give them the vote unless try owned property (aka, only the rich), and instituted the electoral college to remove the public from direct influence on elections, since they didn’t trust the common man’s education or resistance to manipulation.

      • Charles Vincent

        “The Constitution was written to protect the rights of individuals and limit the powers of government. In other words, it was intended to preserve liberty. Not only did the Founders not intend for public policy to be determined democratically, they actively tried to design their new government to prevent public policy from being directed by the demands of its citizens. They recognized that liberty could be compromised by democracy, and that the will of the majority had the potential to be just as tyrannical as a king or dictator.”

        A person didn’t have to be rich to own property and you had to be 21 in order to vote until 1965 when congress changed the voting age to 18″.

  • I say “let’s keep that old-time tradition going; round ’em all up, right now!”

  • Ed

    this is really poorly written

    • Tim Simoneaux

      It reads more like an angsty teenager’s blog than an actual article.

  • rbergen

    Even better: the whole idea of creating a new constitution after the articles of federation had failed, was in part a reaction to Shay’s rebellion (1786-87). That revolt of revolutionary war veterans and others tried to stop the Commenwealth of Massachusettes from collecting taxes, revenue that was needed to solve the state’s debt problems created by war expenditures. This rebellion was supressed violently. One of the reasons for constituting a federal government was to create a more equitable system of repaying the national debt so that further rebellions could be avoided. Still didn’t work, so Washington sent out militias from several states to suppress the Whiskey Rebellion and enforce federal laws. You’re scared that Obama would send in the troops to oppress citizens? He would only be following George Washington’s example.

    It’s always quite amusing that tea partiers pretty much ignore the main articles of the Constitution WHOSE ONLY PURPOSE WAS TO CREATE A STRONG CENTRAL GOVERNMENT (sorry, I’ll stop shouting now) and only refer to the first ten amendments which were proposed and ratified four years after the inauguration of the federal government, kind of as an afterthought.

    The elite founding fathers would have considered today’s tea partiers as uncouth riffraff that needed to be put in their place.

    • Charles Vincent

      The amendments weren’t an after thought in fact they were a condition of the states ratifying the constitution, and the founders knew that and so should you.

      “You’re scared that Obama would send in the troops to oppress citizens? He would only be following George Washington’s example.”
      Read history the people involved in the whiskey rebellion didn’t have a just reason to rebel as they were adequately represented in congress, unlike the colonies under British rule.

      “It’s always quite amusing that tea partiers pretty much ignore the main articles of the Constitution WHOSE ONLY PURPOSE WAS TO CREATE A STRONG CENTRAL GOVERNMENT”

      The founding fathers didn’t want a strong central government, they wanted it limited. They also favored states rights over central government. The constitution was intended to limit the size and scope of the government any constitutional scholar will tell you that.

      • rbergen

        Alexander Hamilton wrote in the Federal Papers No. 84 that a bill of rights was not necessary as it was already contained implicitly in the Constitution and in common law. Quite to the contrary “bills of rights, in the sense and in the extent in which they are contended for, are not only unnecessary in the proposed constitution, but would even be dangerous.” Because enumerating rights could be misconstrued as limiting rights to the ones declared. The Constitutional Assembly saw no necessity of a bill of rights. It was only when several states made their assent dependent on the passage of a bill of rights by the first new Congress that it became an issue. Thus Hamilton’s response.

        Shay’s rebellion took place in Massachusetts that had an elected legislature.

        The constitutional convention was called because the Articles of Confederation were not working since all decisions had to be unanimous between the states. It was the lack of authority of the federal government that led the founding fathers to scrap the articles of confederation and write a new constitution to construct a stronger, functioning central government. It could only work if it ruled by majority decisions, i.e. if necessary against the will of individual states. Safeguards against tyranny were put in place, in particular a bicameral parliament.

      • Charles Vincent

        I wasn’t arguing that please read the post I was replying to. All the founders though our rights were given by our creator and they listed them for good reason we have far more right than they listed and they listed the ones they though to be the most important to list and that contained the Essence of our natural rights. They also listed them so it was clear that government had no power to infringe on them with out due process.

      • xnerd

        Thank you.

        You would have gotten an outstanding grade in my class

      • disambiguation

        To your point, the Constitution was designed to remedy the situation where a “national government” – term used loosely because the Articles of Confederation did not create a sovereign federal state – was powerless to enforce its decisions. The Articles of Confederation created a union of “mutual friendship” among independently sovereign states. The Constitution, on the other hand, was designed to create and strengthen a federal government. In the words of many a “constitutional scholar,” the Constitution was designed to split the atom of sovereignty so that both states and the federal government were sovereign within their respective spheres.

        Therefore, the Constitution was not designed to “limit” the powers of a Federal Government, it was designed to create a powerful federal system that did not previously exist but whose power was not unlimited. Without the Constitution, what we would effectively have is multiple independent sovereign nations which formed an alliance much like the European Union (which is not, itself, a sovereign entity). So the Constitution was power granting rather than power limiting document. That it doesn’t grant unlimited power does not change the fact that it was designed to create a powerful federal government.

        The Bill of Rights, on the other hand, as it was drafted and ratified afterwards, is a document designed to limit the scope of powers just granted to the federal government (whether it was viewed as necessary or not is a matter for another day and an issue on which views changed during the course of the ratification process).

        While this is somewhat of an academic debate, it is completely inaccurate to say that any “constitutional scholar” will tell you that the Constitution was designed to limit the size and scope of the federal government. As was shown, it was designed to take power from sovereign nations and vest that power in a centralized government whose power would be limited only to those enumerated powers granted to it.

      • Charles Vincent

        The body of the constitution not only splits the full power of the government in to the executive the legislative and the judicial it also describes exactly what each branch can and cannot do. Then in the tenth amendment it further limits the federal government basically saying if its isn’t listed they don’t have it and it it isn’t a state power it’s the people’s power. You really need to read the federalist papers the talk about limiting the scope and power of the government.

      • Asher Frost

        Ok, let me try to explain. Before the Constitution, there effectively was no federal government to limit, ok? If I draw a picture, and draw it 3 inches high, am I limiting it to 3 inches, or am I creating something 3 inches in length? That’s the difference being argued here.

      • Charles Vincent

        No that’s is a false comparison. Before the constitution we had the articles of confederation.

        Theses are the listed powers of the branches of government:

        Executive branch

        SECTION. 1. The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows: Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

        The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the Seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the Presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the Certificates, and the Votes shall then be counted. The Person having the greatest Number of Votes shall be the President, if such Number be a Majority of the whole Number of Electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such Majority, and have an equal Number of Votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately chuse by Ballot one of them for President; and if no Person have a Majority, then from the five highest on the List the said House shall in like Manner chuse the President. But in chusing the President, the Votes shall be taken by States, the Representation from each State having one Vote; A quorum for this Purpose shall consist of a Member or Members from two thirds of the States, and a Majority of all the States shall be necessary to a Choice. In every Case, after the Choice of the President, the Person having the greatest Number of Votes of the Electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal Votes, the Senate shall chuse from them by Ballot the Vice President.

        The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.
        No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.

        In mCase of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death, Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said Office, the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability, both of the President and Vice President, declaring what Officer shall then act as President, and such Officer shall act accordingly, until the Disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.

        The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.

        Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation:–“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

        SECTION. 2. The President shall be Commander in
        Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment.
        He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments. The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session.

        SECTION. 3. He shall from time to time give to the
        Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them, with Respect to the Timeof Adjournment, he may adjourn them to such Time as he shall think proper; he shall receive Ambassadors and other public Ministers; he shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed, and shall Commission all the Officers of the United States.

        SECTION. 4. The President, Vice President and all
        civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

        Legislative branch

        SECTION. 1. All legislative Powers herein granted
        shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

        SECTION. 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.

        Judicial branch

        U.S. Constitution › Article III

        Article III

        Section 1.

        The
        judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme
        Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time
        ordain and establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior
        courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at
        stated times, receive for their services, a compensation, which shall
        not be diminished during their continuance in office.

        Section 2.

        The
        judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising
        under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties
        made, or which shall be made, under their authority;–to all cases
        affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls;–to all cases
        of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction;–to controversies to which the
        United States shall be a party;–to controversies between two or more
        states;–between a state and citizens of another state;–between
        citizens of different states;–between citizens of the same state
        claiming lands under grants of different states, and between a state, or
        the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects.

        In
        all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls,
        and those in which a state shall be party, the Supreme Court shall have
        original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the
        Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and
        fact, with such exceptions, and under such regulations as the Congress
        shall make.

        The trial of all crimes, except in cases of
        impeachment, shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the state
        where the said crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed
        within any state, the trial shall be at such place or places as the
        Congress may by law have directed.

        Section 3.

        Treason
        against the United States, shall consist only in levying war against
        them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No
        person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two
        witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court.

        The
        Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason, but no
        attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture
        except during the life of the person attainted.

        No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen.

        Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of freePersons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other Persons.The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct.The number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand, but each State shall have at Least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to chuse three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New-York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, South Carolina five, and Georgia three.

        When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.

        The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers;and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.

        SECTION. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote.

        Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one third may be chosen every second Year;and if Vacancies happen by Resignation, or otherwise, during the Recess of the Legislature of any State, the Executive thereof may make temporary Appointments until the next Meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such Vacancies.

        No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen. The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided. The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the Office of President of the United States.

        The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present. Judgment in Cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law.

        SECTION. 4. The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators.

        The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by Law appoint a different Day.

        SECTION. 5. Each House shall be the Judge of the
        Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members,and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under such Penalties as each House may provide.

        Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member.
        Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on the Journal. Neither House, during the Session of Congress, shall, without the Consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other Place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.

        SECTION. 6. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States.They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.

        No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a Member of either House during his Continuance in Office.

        SECTION. 7. All Bills for raising Revenue shall
        originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills.

        Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States; If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the Objections at large on their Journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such Reconsideration two thirds of that House shall agree to pass the Bill, it shall be sent, together with the Objections, to the other House, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two thirds of that House, it shall become a Law. But in all such Cases the Votes of both Houses shall be determined by Yeas and Nays, and the Names of the Persons voting for and against the Bill shall be entered on the Journal of each House respectively. If any Bill shall not be returned by the President within ten Days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the Same shall be a Law, in like Manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their Adjournment prevent its Return, in which Case it shall not be a Law.

        Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the Rules and Limitations prescribed in the Case of a Bill.

        SECTION. 8. The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;

        To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;

        To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;

        To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;

        To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures;

        To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States;

        To establish Post Offices and post Roads;

        To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;

        To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

        To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offenses against the Law of Nations;

        To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;

        To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years;

        To provide and maintain a Navy; To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces;

        To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions;

        To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;

        To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards and other needful Buildings;-And

        To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.

        SECTION. 9. The Migration or Importation of such
        Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person.

        The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.

        No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.

        No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.

        No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.

        No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to the Ports of one State over those of another: nor shall Vessels bound to, or from, one State, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay Duties in another.

        No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time to time.

        No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

        SECTION. 10. No State shall enter into any Treaty,
        Alliance, or Confederation; grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of Contracts, or grant any Title of Nobility. No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing it’s inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to the Revision and Control of the Congress.

        No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay.

        Judicial branch

        Section 1.
        The judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behaviour, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services, a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.

        Section 2.
        The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority;–to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls;–to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction;–to controversies to which the United States shall be a party;–to controversies between two or more states;–between a state and citizens of another state;–between citizens of different states;–between citizens of the same state claiming lands under grants of different states, and between a state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects.

        In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a state shall be party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions, and under such regulations as the Congress shall make.
        The trial of all crimes, except in cases of
        impeachment, shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the state where the said crimes shall have been committed; but when not committedwithin any state, the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress may by law have directed.

        Section 3.
        Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court.

        The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted.

      • Charles Vincent

        They do not allow links, your post has been deleted.

      • Charles Vincent

        and draw it 3 inches high, am I limiting it to 3 inches, or am I creating something 3 inches in length?

        That is circular logic. Try again.

      • Kerry Woods-Relf

        Actually, in personal documentations and letters by the founders and framers it is very clear they.must certainly did want a strong central government. States rights were to be respected, but nit paramount.

      • Charles Vincent

        They wanted stronger that the articles of confederation abut not complete power in 1 person or group of people this is clear if you read the federalist papers. You’re arguing semantics.

        “States rights were to be respected, but nit paramount.”

        This is flatly false read the tenth amendment;
        “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”

      • Cemetery Girl

        While I can’t say that I agree with the rebellion, at that time it was felt by some (mostly farmers) that there was merit to it. At the time role of the government was still being established. Also, shipping methods were cruder. The ability to earn by selling whiskey as opposed to the grain it took to make the whiskey was much larger. This is what made whiskey a good choice for taxation. Not saying that violent action was the correct reaction to the tax (in fact it shows that despite what the yahoos wanting to fight off government officials so they could feed their cattle on government land for free would NOT have had the support of many of the founding fathers), but the sentiments that lead to violent rebellion did have support of some that did not participate. The more things change, the more they stay the same

      • Charles Vincent

        “yahoos wanting to fight off government officials so they could feed
        their cattle on government land for free would NOT have had the support
        of many of the founding fathers),”

        This is a more complicated thing than you’re wanting to admit.

    • Kerry Woods-Relf

      Amen! I am a native Bostonian and never knew until I joined Facebook how little many Americans outside of New England are taught about pre and post Revolutionary U.S. history.

      • Nancy B

        I beg your pardon. Philly area native here who had a heavy dose of this part of our history.

  • Z54

    Yes, the founding fathers would be displeased with the teabaggers. But do you really think that they would be happy with the republicans, democrats, Shrub or Slick Oily? They would also question why We the People haven’t done anything about it!

  • hahaha!!!!!!!!! Yeah OK

    …and they would’ve loved the CORPORATE WHORES using TAX PAYERS MONIES TO FUND BIG BANKS – BIG SOLAR – BIG INFASTRRUCTURE – BIG PHARMA (OBAMACARE) that “””DEMOCRATS””” have become ..OK bruh

    • Martin

      No, Big Solar? Where let me in on it! Big Infrastructure? You can get off the internet now, Stop driving on the freeways, using airports, fire departments, Police dept’s etc . Big Pharmaceuticals? You are a RWNJ. Big Pharmaceuticals and Corporate health care is what Obama care has tried stopped. That’s why your Wholly owned Corporate Congressmen have been trying to overturn it, you mutton head sheeple rouser… WOW! You need to read your history and you need to stop listening to Rush limpdick cuz you are completely backasswards in your assumptions and assertions…First of all Your Buddy Bushwacked is big oil, and Banks where do you think the Banking crisis came from? It didn;t just appear out of nowhere the moment the GOP thought it was losing it’s grip…Also, the Bush family was involved in the original 1980’s deregulation crisis ‘Continental Illinois’ If you dig into it you find the Vice president’s family(Bush) plundering billions at the expense of the tax payers. I would bet that they showed all their friends how easy it was and they all had a ball at our expense this last round…

  • xnerd

    I am glad someone blogged about the actual reasons behind the revolt regarding taxes. The founding fathers were not anti tax. They were against unrepresented taxations. Moreover they were against taxation that did not benefit the colonies only made the royalty and the east indian traders more gluttonously rich.

    This mentality is in complete opposition to I.Q. deprived rednecks and what they so moronically THINK they represent.

    Taxation is a necessary evil in this world, unless of coarse you would like to live in a disease infested cesspool with mud trails and lawlessness.

    The saddest part of this whole situation is that these toothless idiots actually believe their own Bullshit. Its horrifying to see my fellow man work in diametric opposition to his own best interests.

  • John

    I am a Democrat, and a strong believer in the Second Amendment. The only way to bring about the badly needed compromise needed in this country for us to move forward is for both sides to STOP the political profiling, the blatant lumping and categorizing, that is so obvious in this article. Certainly, there are some points I agree with, but the “name calling” is unnecessary and destructive. I also want to say that the “well regulated militia” is only one part of the Second Amendment, the second part being “the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed”.

    • Kerry Woods-Relf

      Does it occur to you to consider just what “arms” consisted of in the time of the framers? Had they envisioned AR-15 in schools and theaters, I assure you that they’d have been much more specific.

      • Tim Simoneaux

        Does it occur to you to consider just what “press” consisted of in the time of the framers? Had they envisioned Internet Blogging by school children and Hollywood actors, I assure you that they’d have been much more specific.

    • Sue Roediger

      but …………..do you not agree that there are SOME people who should not be allowed anywhere near a gun?????

      • Tim Simoneaux

        Yes, and by law those people are already prohibited from owning or possessing a gun. But, just like no one in the US is allowed to own or possess heroin, it doesn’t stop them from doing it.

  • Roberta Privette

    Manny Schewitz – I remember that wine.

    Encourage substantive debate on the evidence by knowledgeable proponents of all points of view.
    – Carl Sagan

  • William

    This article leaves out some key facts about the Shay’s and Whiskey rebellions.

    First, only a handful of people died between the two rebellions, and they were not brutally dealt with. Virtually everyone that was arrested was then pardoned..

    Second, the use of military force to put down the “rebellions” was not universally supported among the Founders. The Federalists believed in levying the taxes and putting the rebellions down with military force, but neither position was representative of the Anti-Federalists.

    Third, in the case of the whiskey tax, it was later repealed by Thomas Jefferson and the Anti-Federalists. The Federalists were hardly representative of all the Founders, but this article seems to accept the actions and beliefs of the Federalists as being those of the Founders more broadly.

    Finally, after Shay’s Rebellion, Thomas Jefferson said, “Even this evil is productive of good. It prevents the degeneracy of government, and nourishes a general attention to the public affairs. I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical.”

    Again, in reference to Shay’s Rebellion, Jefferson said, “What country can preserve it’s liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon & pacify them. What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants. It is it’s natural manure.”

  • KENPOMAN68

    THIS PERSON THAT WROTE THIS IS CRAZZZZZZZZZZZZZZYYYYYYYYYY^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    • Sue Roediger

      Noooooooooooo

  • michael james

    In reading these comments, it reinforces the realization of why the Republicans are getting votes from people from whose pockets they are stealing. Those people are the ignorants who were ‘raised’ by the corporate/political fascism present in this country to create just such a loud-mouthed ranting fan club. They don’t know, they don’t care, they just do as they’re told.

  • secretlab

    Present day tea partiers have subverted the original ‘no taxation without representation.’ Now, it’s no taxes for unhinged billionaires, who indeed have the best Congressmen and Senators money can buy.